my latest acquisitions

Edward

Well-Known Member
Added what could be 1940s NOS spiral notebooks to my office collection. I say "could be" as this product remained unchanged through the 50s but I found many examples of these used as diaries and author notes dating in the late 1930s to mid 1940s. Nice yellowed aging vintage paper items on my desktop just the same.

The Western Tablet & Stationery Company (Westab) was founded in 1906 by Henry Dayton and William Albrecht in St. Joseph, MO. They went on to become a dominant company in the consumer paper industry by the mid-1920s. (Second location in Dayton, OH) They continued with this success until they were bought by Meade Company in 1966. Westab mainly focused on manufacturing inexpensive packaged stationery goods and their famous ruled writing tablet. The most familiar products produced by Western Tablet were its "Spiral", "Big Chief" and "Hytone" composition books, an item arguably used by nearly every school student and aspiring author in America from the 1920s through the 1960s. The Hytone and Spiral composition tablets are trademarked items still widely used in America, particularly among American grade school and college students.
IMG_0012.JPG
IMG_0013.JPG


(below a clipping from an online posting about a diary dating 1938 thru 1940 using the same Spiral notebook by Westab)
WESTAB1938_40diary.jpg

1940s-handwritten-letters-gene-dennis_1_c716522045d10c216f17d64fcf0ccd94.jpg
1940s-handwritten-letters-gene-dennis_1_c716522045d10c216f17d64fcf0ccd94-1.jpg
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
Added a couple more WWII era pencils to the heap. a Dixon Oriole with a paper ferrule and a rather patriotic pencil with a plastic ferrule.

I also added a wood ruler to my vintage 40's office. This one seems to be a 1940s promotional ruler (very common for companies to have imprinted giveaway rulers) and the wording on this one seems to indicate WWII wartime manufacture. a bit worn and used but that gives it more charm in my opinion.
Happy Memorial Day
I appreciate those that served, serve today, and will serve so that I may live free and enjoy the lifestyle that I am accustomed to.

IMG_0040.JPG
IMG_0041.JPG
IMG_0043.JPG
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
Edward, I must say I really like what you're doing ! IMO, those stationery and day to day items are true living history.
thanks man. it certainly gives me an interesting environment to hang out in when watching WWII and1940s movies.
this you might roll your eyes at though :D
why have any modern waste bin when you can have a vintage period correct one in the office? :rolleyes: :D (nice heavy steel... probably 1930s)
IMG_0052.JPG
IMG_0053.JPG
1929Spittoon.jpg


Should I get a spitoon? :p

0e1089d965a5c42c3be66ee877b80917.jpg
Screen Shot 2020-05-16 at 2.10.40 PM.png
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
I want a 1940s school teacher desk as that was the typical office desk of the era as well (as you can see in the pics above) they tend to be pricey at antique shops but cheap via individuals on Facebook. I have found a few in my region but they are big and heavy and I would have to rent a truck and pay mileage. Hoping to find one local one day but not in a hurry for it. The vintage office chairs though are what people ask top dollar for no matter!
 

Cocker

Well-Known Member
this you might roll your eyes at though :D
Oh no, I wouldn't! Although my home office is nothing in the vein of what you have there, I still haven't bought a proper trash bin, because none looks the part with what I have in my mind! I don't want no modern plastic trash, nor something all nice and sophisticated. I want something like that one! :p

I really do appreciate the search and sheer amount of details and background story your can produce for almost every of those items, even the menial ones like pencils.
 

Rory Schultz

Active Member
That is such a heart break seeing the tape dispenser....."sniff sniff" I cleaned out my garage last summer and had a silver grey one and threw it away. I did not stop enough to think if it was a collectable, I just wanted to get rid of the mess piled up. I am afraid to think of the boxes of other stuff I threw out after only a slight glance inside.
 

kirova

Active Member
That is such a heart break seeing the tape dispenser....."sniff sniff" I cleaned out my garage last summer and had a silver grey one and threw it away. I did not stop enough to think if it was a collectable, I just wanted to get rid of the mess piled up. I am afraid to think of the boxes of other stuff I threw out after only a slight glance inside.
I can fully understand the "thrower's remorse", I guess we might need some counselling from Maria Kondo :)
 
Last edited:

Edward

Well-Known Member
50 Cal ball M2 from Nevada Dry lake bed AAF Target ranges

Got these 50 cal ball M2 rounds come From a guy named Gly that hosts a show called Abandoned and Forgotten Places. He gathered these up last month at the Nellis Air Force Gunnery and Bombing Range in Nevada at the Mojave Desert dry lake bed target ranges. (There were Several Army Airfields established around the area which includes the notorious Area 51!)
In 1942 the region was restricted from public access for War Department to use. Gunnery training began in 1942, with guntruck platforms being used in January and February. By July 1942 the Fourth Air Force Bombing and Gunnery Range Detachment arrived as the 1st unit.
February 1943 the area was being used for the 82d Flying Training Wing for air-to-air gunnery training
B-17 Flying Fortresses arrived in 1942 and allowed training of 600 gunnery students and 215 co-pilots every five weeks at the height of the war. More than 45,000 B-17 gunners were trained and the USAAF training movie The Rear Gunner was filmed in the area in 1943. The 82d Flying Training Wing (Flexible Gunnery) was activated at the base as one of ten Army Air Forces Flying Training Command wings on 23 August 1943. By 1944, gunnery students utilized B-17, B-24 Liberator and YB-40 Flying Fortress gunship aircraft firing at aircraft-towed targets.
March 1945, the base switched to B-29 gunnery training which included the manipulation trainer on the ground with camera guns. Flexible gunnery training ended in September 1945.

These litter the dry lake bed by the thousands and I was able to get 30 of these for a mere $18.50 shipped!
IMG_0194.JPG
IMG_0195.JPG
IMG_0196.JPG
50caldesert2.jpg
50caldesert3.jpg
50caldesert6.jpg



50caldesert9.jpg
 
Top