my latest acquisitions

Edward

Well-Known Member
Your office is just too cool Edward, I absolutely love it and all the wonderful attention to even the smallest details. Fantastic stuff!
thanks! I am super stoked about this file card cabinet! to be 1940's vintage is one thing but to be marked as having actually been used during WWII by the USAAF really puts it over the top for me! As my friends in the UK would say... I'm chuffed! :p
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
This my my favourite thread anyplace, anywhere, anytime,
Edward your collection is amazing
Thanks guys… I always feel a little weird posting ephemera stuff to a website that’s about Vintage Leather Jackets! LOL! There’s not too many places I can share my related collectibles at… The fedora lounge is one place but it’s all but dead over there for some reason. And there aren’t many Facebook groups that even deal with this sort of thing oddly enough…I thought about starting a vintage office group there but not sure I want to operate a forum group and all that goes with it. I guess collecting Vintage office items is very esoteric thing these days lol!
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Edward

Well-Known Member
More like way behind the times... lol! I just have a kinky fetish for old school vintage office supplies particularly 30's/40's... today's haul:
3 small NOS leatherette notebooks probably from the late 30's to early 40s (3 for 10¢!)
a set of 7 (with original packing sleeve) Dixon Oriole No. 2 pencils with Paper ferrules. so WWII era production. (need 5 more to complete the set!)
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Edward

Well-Known Member
Today I added a very interesting little piece to my foot locker. A Scotch brand stamped metal cellulose tape dispenser. Scotch didn't start using the red/green plaid design in their marketing until late 1945 so this little blue/cream color dispenser from prewar/WWII era is particularly hard to find. I wanted one because it is shown in a WWII army signal corps soldier's footlocker inspection photo. so naturally I was on the hunt!
It came with what was left of a used postwar tin reel of tape (hence the red/green on that piece)
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B-Man2

Well-Known Member
Ed
Your collection just keeps getting better and better.
Have you ever seen a WWII K-Ration Hershey Bar during your searches?
 

Wholenineyards

Well-Known Member
Edward, I think you are doing extremely fine with all these additions. But I cannot be envious, as, get this: NASA is putting together this theory, that indeed we are living in parallel universes, and our twin universe has time going backwards! Awesome. I'll catch that bus, bring a couple of bucks and get all these items for really cheap when I'll pass 1942 on my way to see the first powered and manned flight and shake the hand of Gustave Weisshaupt, the first ever Flyer. Apparently.
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
as you followers of my insanity know, I have a thing for WWII era coffee mugs. This week I finally added the famous 1940s "Victor" Mug to my collection. (many mistake it as the word Victory)
A Victor mug was named for the company and its location in the village of Victor, upstate New York.)
The Victor Insulators, Inc. reopened an old insulator plant at Victor, NY in 1935. The facilities were refurbished and production started in August with just four of the 15 kilns in operation.
With WWII the demand for insulators dropped considerably. Victor Insulators decided to branch out into other areas.

“Several years ago an investigation was made by Victor Insulators, Inc., to determine the advisability of manufacturing additional products. Although the insulator business is not seasonal in the same way that many industries are, the management felt that additional products would provide steady employment and insure weekly wages year ‘round for Victor’s employees.”

“As a result of this study it was decided to start the fabrication of high quality, heavy duty chinaware – a product manufactured from the same raw materials as insulators and a process that would utilize similar ceramic production methods and craftsmanship.”

“The war gave impetus to the development of the chinaware business. Orders for great quantities of rugged cups and bowls built to military specifications have been and are being delivered to the Army and Navy.”

“At present a substantial part of Victor’s business is devoted to the production of Victor chinaware for the armed services.”

“In the postwar era, steady employment for scores of new workers is planned to take care of the increasing demand for this type of chinaware.”

The heavy “Victor” coffee mugs were originally used on Navy ships because the mugs did not tip over easily. Later during the war the Army started placing orders. The handle-less military version was popular stateside, too, and the handle version became very popular in restaurants all over the country. The convex shape lent itself to warming the hands and it was almost indestructible. It was solid and seldom broke when dropped.

At the height of the company’s mug manufacturing, there were about 15 employees working in that section. The cups were pressed and trimmed and the handles were cast from liquid clay and stuck to the mugs with clay slip. Only three women “handle stickers” worked the difficult job of applying the handles. Later, it became necessary to know exactly who produced which mug. Imagine if a run of mugs suddenly had problems. How do you figure out which employee needs more training?

Starting on December 14, 1943, each mug was stamped VICTOR on the bottom for branding where it previously had used a painted stamp. However, few knew that the practice served an additional internal purpose.
If you look closely at the stamps, many have certain sections of text missing. Each employee had their own stamp that they would use with a unique marking indicating their having worked on the mug. One may have been the leg of an ‘R’ removed, or half of the letter ‘I’ or deeper blocking around certain letters. The subtle tactic became a function of quality control utilizing unique intentional "defect" errors in the stamp as manufacturer tells.
The cups were usually white but also were made in black, mahogany, sky-gray, chocolate, light blue, natural tan and white with a green strip around the lip.

Right around 1980, Chinese companies began to produce the iconic white coffee mugs and distribute them worldwide. Many Chinese knock-offs even had the word ‘VICTORY’ stamped in the bottom, but with a poorly pressed ‘Y’, so at quick glance it might look like ‘VICTOR’. They used a Serif font whereas the original is sans serif. Victor Insulators started including the stamp ‘MADE IN U.S.A.’ on the bottom of the mugs right around 1984. The mugs ran a few more years until 1987 and completely phased out by 1990.


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The Hollywood Canteen

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B-Man2

Well-Known Member
Today I added a very interesting little piece to my foot locker. A Scotch brand stamped metal cellulose tape dispenser. Scotch didn't start using the red/green plaid design in their marketing until late 1945 so this little blue/cream color dispenser from prewar/WWII era is particularly hard to find. I wanted one because it is shown in a WWII army signal corps soldier's footlocker inspection photo. so naturally I was on the hunt!
It came with what was left of a used postwar tin reel of tape (hence the red/green on that piece)
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Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Co.
later changed to 3M wasn’t it?
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
this was my pet project today . Hobby Lobby had a 50% off sale on all shadowbox frames so.... I envisioned Wowness.... I'm not wowed but at least now this stuff is on display instead of hidden in my desk drawer. :D
there is enough room in the pennant shadowbox to add a bunch of patches... hmmm.
now to hang on the wall...
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