Jacket Fade…Will it Work? ….

B-Man2

Well-Known Member
A few years ago I remember reading a post about a guy who owned a Good Wear Acme 21996 and whenever he wasn’t wearing it left it on the dash board of his truck in the hot sun with the intense UV rays. After a few years the jacket looked fantastic. It had fade areas and looked like a original Aero 21996 with its russet under color bleeding through the reddish topcoat. There are photos here someplace of that jacket, but I just haven’t been able to find them . If anyone knows how to locate them please post them . But I digress … several years ago I purchased a GW Acme 21996 from a member who has since left the forum. During some of our discussions he told me that he had purchased the jacket and had requested a jacket with a russet undercoat and a reddish topcoat that would eventually fade and wear away like the originals from that contract. I’ve had that jacket for a few years now but living in a warm climate with only a couple of months a year for wearing jackets, not much has developed on this jacket. As a result I’ve decided to accelerate the process and try something similar to the guy who left his jacket on the dash board of his truck. I’ve taken a few before photos, and starting yesterday I began leaving the jacket out in the intense Florida sun shine each day. I just throw it up on the outside table and let the sun beat down on it . I mean what could possibly go wrong?….. right? :rolleyes:

…I’ve taken before photos and will take photos about once a week to show how it progresses. So this is the jacket and below it is the look I’m hoping to achieve. Please feel free to comment on this crazy idea.
Cheers
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mulceber

Well-Known Member
Thanks for making your jacket a guinea pig so we can learn about the effects of sunlight on leather, Burt! I will be following this with great interest.

Burt,

I like the idea...but would it really make sense to spread the jacket on the table? Wouldn't that lead to a rather uniform fading effect?

Maybe just throw it on the table and leave it just the way it fell?

Best regards,

Ties

Interesting thought. Although wouldn't the exposure of originals to the sun be fairly even, since the pilots were wearing them while doing all kinds of things at all times of day?
 

B-Man2

Well-Known Member
Hi Ties
You’re spot on with this. I spread it out only for this photo to show everyone the jacket. When I put it in the sun I just throw it up on the table and leave it as it lands .
Burt,

I like the idea...but would it really make sense to spread the jacket on the table? Wouldn't that lead toa rather uniform fading effect?

Maybe just throw it on the table and leave it just the way it fell?

Best regards,

Ties
 

Silver Surfer

Well-Known Member
yes, it does work. laid flat on one side and then turned over remembering to lay the sleeves so they are flat seam to seam so as to not get a fade line down the center of the sleeve. gotta watch out for heat, as the heat can shrink the jacket. currently, im doing the sun treatment on the rw 1401 that I traded for with jan. its coming along nice and subtle. many originals faded with use in fighter aircraft.
 

Enigma1938

Well-Known Member
I'm curious how this will turn out. I've planned something similar with a blue N1 deck jacket. They only look authentic when faded.
 

Micawber

Well-Known Member
A bit of scrubbing with a cloth loaded with some isopropyl alcohol on the high points of the creases, exposed wear areas and seams will achieve pretty much the same effect. Acetone will get the job done in treble quick chop chop hurt hurry time but best know when to stop! Takes a bit of experimentation / experience to achieve a good result.
 

Spitfireace

Well-Known Member
A bit of scrubbing with a cloth loaded with some isopropyl alcohol on the high points of the creases, exposed wear areas and seams will achieve pretty much the same effect. Acetone will get the job done in treble quick chop chop hurt hurry time but best know when to stop! Takes a bit of experimentation / experience to achieve a good result.
It's easy to poison yourself with Acetone. Rubbing alcohol is easier to deal with.
 
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