WW2 Fit for the billionth time

CoopDog

Active Member
I don't know what the original gov't specifications were, but it should be relatively easy for manufacturers to find out and manufacture repro. jackets to within those specs and tolerances. Then, unless you are getting a custom tailored jacket, you just pick the size that fits you closest. Most everyone will fit in a 38,40,42,44 or 46 and usually those are the only choices. PERIOD. Just like WWII. Everyone's body is different. Some will fit trim, some will be loose. Some will be between sizes and will have to go one size up. Not many will be a perfect tailored fit. Remember, these were working jackets. So stop fussing you bloody poofters!
 

mulceber

Well-Known Member
I don't know what the original gov't specifications were, but it should be relatively easy for manufacturers to find out and manufacture repro. jackets to within those specs and tolerances. Then, unless you are getting a custom tailored jacket, you just pick the size that fits you closest. Most everyone will fit in a 38,40,42,44 or 46 and usually those are the only choices. PERIOD. Just like WWII. Everyone's body is different. Some will fit trim, some will be loose. Some will be between sizes and will have to go one size up. Not many will be a perfect tailored fit. Remember, these were working jackets. So stop fussing you bloody poofters!
That seems unnecessary. This is a vintage jacket forum, and we like to debate repro details. If you don’t like doing that, nobody’s forcing you to participate, or even to be here.

Re: your first point about contracts, that’s not how Government contracting works. They don’t issue patterns to the companies, they give them a list of requirements and specifications. As a result, there’s a thousand little differences among contracts.
 
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Officer Dibley

Well-Known Member
It doesn’t matter what build you are, if a jacket fits snug when you are stood up with your hands by your side, there is no way in hell you can push your arms forwards to the yoke/stick position. Let alone wear layers when cold on the ground or in the air.
 

Officer Dibley

Well-Known Member
I don't know what the original gov't specifications were, but it should be relatively easy for manufacturers to find out and manufacture repro.
If someone in NASA thought the Saturn V rocket plans were only good for the bin, how do you think WW2 jacket makers felt about their patterns when contracts stopped coming ?
They did not all squirrel them away for the day when geeks wanted to re-make a jacket made in the hundreds of thousands .

I say that in a good humoured way and not attacking you or your worth. Sadly i feel i now need to write that because of how the forum is these days......

In fact i have enjoyed your posts so far :)
 

Ken at Aero Leather

Well-Known Member
It doesn’t matter what build you are, if a jacket fits snug when you are stood up with your hands by your side, there is no way in hell you can push your arms forwards to the yoke/stick position. Let alone wear layers when cold on the ground or in the air.
Maybe??????
I've never flown but I have driven some very unforgiving race and rally cars (Cobra, Healey 3000. Group A Mini Cooper). I always went for a very high armhole racing suit for best movement as opposed to any other fit criteria
 

DiamondDave

Well-Known Member
I don't know what the original gov't specifications were, but it should be relatively easy for manufacturers to find out and manufacture repro. jackets to within those specs and tolerances. Then, unless you are getting a custom tailored jacket, you just pick the size that fits you closest. Most everyone will fit in a 38,40,42,44 or 46 and usually those are the only choices. PERIOD. Just like WWII. Everyone's body is different. Some will fit trim, some will be loose. Some will be between sizes and will have to go one size up. Not many will be a perfect tailored fit. Remember, these were working jackets. So stop fussing you bloody poofters!
Specs are not easy to find. Most of us are still looking for them. Jackets were offered from sz 34 to sz 54 during WWII. Basic specs were sent out, as were the supplies, but actual patterns were never offered to the companies, at least not by the gov’t. Why this is still considered speculation is beyond me. These are all known facts.
DD
 
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