X-2 - The A-2 Pre Contract Test Jacket by Headwind Mfg Co

Skyhawk

Well-Known Member
I have been hammering out the details on this jacket since the Goldsmith project started. I have had the guys start to put this one together recently, as we have a little room in our R&D department after nailing down the designs of the Aviatrix, High Hats, and Goldsmith jackets.
Harry A_ Johnson.jpeg
march3.jpg


Details:
1. The Jacket appears before the 1931 Goldsmith jacket.
2. A-2 style with tall narrow buttoned pockets. Pockets are slightly wider than an A-1 and taller.
3. No epaulets.
4. 2 wind flaps, one inside, one outside. Hookless zipper without the rivets used.
5. No topstitch on the knits.
6. Large collar with tall fold over to accommodate a snap over neck tab. No snaps inside collar.
7. Pockets have a machined button hole and a single layer of leather backed with lining, like the A-1.
8. Jacket is made of Capeskin. Evidence shown in the drape, graining, and pocket characteristics.

A.G. Spalding is the most likely maker. They are the only ones I have seen install Hookless zippers without the rivets as a practice in manufacturing. They used the no topstitch knit attachment a lot. They used machined button holes during that era. Plus they had provided test jackets for the A-1 program and made a lot of gear under contract with the USAC. It is also believed that they made some of the A-1 contract jackets.

The collar snap. I went back and forth on this one. At first I thought it was a button loop on the collar, but if you look at the blown up image of Johnson, you will see some interesting things.
Collar-Snap-1.jpg


Obviously there's some kind of closure on the collar. On the left side (his right) you can see a round object protruding out of the back side of the collar. On the right, a leather tab sticks out. At first I thought is was a button on the left. That makes no sense as it would be on the inside of the jacket. It is too big for a backing button. I believe it is a rounded button part of a snap. The other part would be on the tab, and it would snap across similar to a cafe' racer, but in reverse. With the snap on the tab and the press button on the other side under the collar.

If you look at the image below, you can see what looks like the back side of a ring snap on the tab in the middle of the neck. In this photo it appears to be hanging loose in front but could possibly be snapped. Hard to tell.
march3.jpg
Snap-Back.jpg


Regards,
Jay
 

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B-Man2

Well-Known Member
Never heard about this jacket or knew that one like this existed . How did you find out about this one ? Are there any records of opurchase orders or contracts on this one?
Interesting for sure. I mean we just learned about the Goldsmith a little more than a year ago, and that was supposed to be the earliest known A2 style jacket purchased by the Army.
when did this one surface?
 

Skyhawk

Well-Known Member
These images have shown up here and there on the forum in the past. They are discussed in the "Button Flap A-2" Thread. They are not technically a "Contract Jacket", more of a test pattern for the A-2 program I believe. I have only seen photos of these 2 jackets so I think it was a very small batch produced. Probably 10 jackets or less going by the numbers in the A-1 test program documentation.
 

2BM2K

Well-Known Member
There are other photo's of the prototype jacket, Ross Hoyt, George Brett, Herbert Dargue.

 

Jorgeenriqueaguilera

Well-Known Member
They are not technically a "Contract Jacket", more of a test pattern for the A-2 program I believe. I have only seen photos of these 2 jackets so I think it was a very small batch produced. Probably 10 jackets or less going by the numbers in the A-1 test program documentation.
Sounds like one of the rarest birds for sure! :eek:
 

Skyhawk

Well-Known Member
First Test jacket done. Came out great! A few changes to make, to be expected on a first attempt. The collar is pretty spot on to what my interpretation was for the style.

The hide is cool stuff. It's a thick antique sheep skin (Modern Cape). The original was genuine capeskin and the jacket will be offered in our Capeskin as well as other hide choices.
march3.jpg
Front-2.jpg



Details:
1. The Jacket appears before the 1931 Goldsmith jacket.
2. A-2 style with tall narrow buttoned pockets. Pockets are slightly wider than an A-1 and taller.
3. No epaulets.
4. 2 wind flaps, one inside, one outside. Hookless zipper without the rivets used.
5. No topstitch on the knits.
6. Large collar with tall fold over to accommodate a snap over neck tab. No snaps inside collar.
7. Pockets have a machined button hole and a single layer of leather backed with lining, like the A-1.
8. Jacket is made of Capeskin. Evidence shown in the drape, graining, and pocket characteristics.

A.G. Spalding is the most likely maker. They are the only ones I have seen install Hookless zippers without the rivets as a practice in manufacturing. They used the no topstitch knit attachment a lot. They used machined button holes during that era. Plus they had provided test jackets for the A-1 program and made a lot of gear under contract with the USAC. It is also believed that they made some of the A-1 contract jackets.

The collar snap. I went back and forth on this one. At first I thought it was a button loop on the collar, but if you look at the blown up image of Johnson, you will see some interesting things. I have tried to position the test jacket in a similar way in the photos below.

Collar-Snap-2.jpg
Front-3.jpg


Collar-Snap-1.jpg
P1050153.JPG


P1050140.JPG


P1050134.JPG P1050139.JPG P1050142.JPG
 
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Ken at Aero Leather

Well-Known Member
Much more practical than the Goldsmith throad latch, no way of telling if the original could be worn studded back under it's own side of the collar so it was hidden behind the LH side when not being used?
Like an Indian Ranger
Big plus if you go down that route
 

Skyhawk

Well-Known Member
Much more practical than the Goldsmith throad latch, no way of telling if the original could be worn studded back under it's own side of the collar so it was hidden behind the LH side when not being used?
Like an Indian Ranger
Big plus if you go down that route
That could be a possibility. It looks like in the close up shot it is folded back. Like you said, no way to tell if there was another stud in there. I would think it would be uncomfortable to have a stud sticking out on the inside collar though as these were the large ring snap type.
 

Ken at Aero Leather

Well-Known Member
That could be a possibility. It looks like in the close up shot it is folded back. Like you said, no way to tell if there was another stud in there. I would think it would be uncomfortable to have a stud sticking out on the inside collar though as these were the large ring snap type.
Worked OK on the later Indian Rangers BTW No need for two sets of studs
Jamesdean Indian Jacket.jpg
 
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