What jacket(s) are you wearing at the moment?

mulceber

Well-Known Member
For Throwback Wednesday, here's one from just about 3 months ago in May. GW Switlik M-422:
IMG_5506.jpeg


Tried to take a couples photo with @Nnatalie, but she got distracted at *just* the right moment:
IMG_5507.jpeg
 

B-Man2

Well-Known Member
For Throwback Wednesday, here's one from just about 3 months ago in May. GW Switlik M-422:
View attachment 82322

Tried to take a couples photo with @Nnatalie, but she got distracted at *just* the right moment:
View attachment 82323
Jan
That Switlik is another keeper for life from JC.
Now the second photo looks like a little payback from yesterdays “Dong” post she tagged you with;)
 

Lorenzo_l

Well-Known Member
Lorenzol
That’s a shame. I like the ELC Werber and the color of hide with the Carmel knits really looks good. Was yours too small or too large for you?
Too large. I ordered a size 40 (my normal size for A-2s) and it was uncomfortably large on me...
 

Kermit3D

Well-Known Member
For Throwback Wednesday, here's one from just about 3 months ago in May. GW Switlik M-422:
View attachment 82322

Tried to take a couples photo with @Nnatalie, but she got distracted at *just* the right moment:
View attachment 82323

This M-422 is just crazy. I don't know anything about USN jackets, but if you had said it was an original, I would have believed it for sure.
Still a very nice grain on Natalie's A-2.
 

Brettafett

Well-Known Member
ELC's Werber 1729 is such a nice jacket. So different to the war contracts. And that one fits you great, Burt.
Too bad mine would not fit and I had to move it on.
I also think so. I was very tempted when I received that first ELC Monarch to try on. That lighter havana warhorse on a 1729 would have looked crazy.
 

Smithy

Well-Known Member
Re the whistles, Steve and Greg are right, it was specifically for use to attract ASR HSLs. The RAF adopted them in widespread use after the experiences of the BoB and also with BC aircraft ditching in the Channel and the trouble of seeing not only a downed airman but even a dinghy in a choppy swell and bad conditions, and obviously also in darkness. There's a reason why it was referred to in RAF parlance as a "ditching whistle". The lurid orange dye pouch was what was used to attract attention of aircraft such as the Walrus.
 
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Smithy

Well-Known Member
The lurid orange dye pouch

The dye pouch always reminds me of a funny story. The first CO of 485(NZ) Sqn Marcus Knight had a bull terrier called Gus who was exceedingly well-endowed in the testicular department. One day Gus wandered into the station mess where the pilots were grounded because of very poor, wet weather and as a result bored. One wag got his dye pouch, grabbed Gus and administered the powder all over Gus' ample balls and then booted him out into the rain where obviously water activates and spreads the dye. Poor old Gus wandered around with bilious, bright orange, nearly glow in the dark balls for quite some time. Needless to say the CO wasn't impressed ;)
 

Micawber

Well-Known Member
Re the whistles, Steve and Greg are right, it was specifically for use to attract ASR HSLs. The RAF adopted them in widespread use after the experiences of the BoB and also with BC aircraft ditching in the Channel and the trouble of seeing not only a downed airman but even a dinghy in a choppy swell and bad conditions, and obviously also in darkness. There's a reason why it was referred to in RAF parlance as a "ditching whistle". The lurid orange dye pouch was what was used to attract attention of aircraft such as the Walrus.

Aye, although commonly referred to as ditching whistles they were issued to virtually all RAF aircrew and can also be seen being worn by many USAAF flight crews. The idea being that it, and other equipment, were to be used to attract the attention of rescue services (or other crewmembers) in the event of ditching or being downed in remote areas inland. Running into high ground that was hidden by low cloud or fog was a surpringly common occurrence in the UK (after narrowly escaping the Japs when they invaded Singapore my wife's uncle was assigned to an RAF mountain rescue).
A variety of metal and plastic models were issued all of which have become collectable in recent years although I remember when they were regarded as just so much surplus and could be bought for not a lot or got for nothing.
Probably the most common aircrew whistle was was the chrome over brass 'snail' type as per the couple I grabbed for a quick photo...

IMG_20220818_082932.jpg

 

Southoftheborder

Well-Known Member
Even if the downed pilot had a megaphone, even then he would not have been heard by rescue plane's crew and no harsh tones whistle would help to hear him :)
As was said it was to attract the attention of boats. In particular the Air Sea Rescue service. They would be looking for a plane which had been reported down in the Channel and would know roughly where to look. They would be looking out for flares and would also would regularly stop their engines to listen out for whistles when in the search zone.

If someone wants to be totally authentic though I suppose they should wear a Mea West with it as well when they go to the pub....

I wrote this before I saw Smithy's and Steve's posts and it crossed with them. I'll just leave it anyway.
 
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