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Tools for making leather patches

wittmann

Active Member
Do not buy the one you suggested it is junk with no strength and plastic gears .Look in the local for sale ads and get a used old one as we suggested you can get them all day long for 50 Euro and yes they work well no problems .

Micawber has pointed out some very good models you should seek .

BIP
thanks, so i can Forget those plastic modern sew machines......
 

Micawber

Well-Known Member
thanks, so i can Forget those plastic modern sew machines......
They are ok for lightweight fabrics such as thin cotton etc but you are pushing your luck if you attempt to sew through layers of even thin leather. Another thing to bear in mind is a good number of modern domestic machines are electronically controlled and attempt to be Jack's of all trades - meaning they will often do a number of different functions such as zig zag stitches etc. Fine for lightweight cotton & wadding quilting but not required for what you want - that is a straight lockstitch machine, perhaps with a reverse for end of run finishing.
 

B-Man2

Well-Known Member
I’m totally taken by all of this. Where does one go to learn how to sew and become at least semi proficient with one of these machines?
 

Bombing IP

Well-Known Member
To learn on one of these machines you can take a course at Jo Ann fabrics ,of find a local sewing machine repair shop and they would maybe help you with the basics .Failing that look on line and seek out information on You tube .

BIP
 

wittmann

Active Member
If your in Germany look for an old Pfaff or Elna they might be more plentiful in your local .

BIP
Hi BIP, nice to see you again!
thanks for tips.

how about following Pfaff?
Pfaff 91
Pfaff 30

I have no idea and experience about sewing machines at all, especially the old sewin machine, which modern sewing machines (under €150) with Warranty and Hand book could you recommend? I know it's almost im possible
 

Micawber

Well-Known Member
Hi BIP, nice to see you again!
thanks for tips.

how about following Pfaff?
Pfaff 91
Pfaff 30

I have no idea and experience about sewing machines at all, especially the old sewin machine, which modern sewing machines (under €150) with Warranty and Hand book could you recommend? I know it's almost im possible
I know you are not asking me specifically so excuse my further input.

Of the machines you link to, the 91 is an electric and I would think that an inexperienced person is going to struggle to negotiate around a small patch design with a machine that is going to be hard to get to run slow enough to be manageable.

The second, the 30 9s more like it in that it is a manual so can be driven at a slow speed just by turning the handle slowly! But that machine lacks the mounting box or stand as what is on offer is just the head. I have looked on Ebay.de and there are a number of manual Pfaff 30 machines with stands on offer but be wary of one that relies on a treadle drive as they too are tricky when it comes to very slow speed stitching.

Adler machines are good but again those available over there at present seem to lack stands, although I'm not sure about this one. There may well be loads more...
 

Micawber

Well-Known Member
I’m totally taken by all of this. Where does one go to learn how to sew and become at least semi proficient with one of these machines?
You might find a small alterations place who will run you through the basics Burt. Basics are similar for most machines but it's always best to get a copy of the specific manual. The key to becoming proficient is the same as most things - practice, practice, practice.
 

jeremiah

Well-Known Member
I have tossed the idea of getting a Cobra class 4 sewing machine around the park a few times. Thing is machines do make for faster work But hand sewing will always trump it in terms of look and the fact that it was done all by hand.

Lots of great videos out there on YouTube to show as well. Just have to understand it takes practice.
My belt making continues to improve but when I first started making them they looked like crap.
 

Bombing IP

Well-Known Member
In reply to are old machines up to the task ,in my experience any dry cleaners or tailors or clothing alteration or repair shop will have an old machine inside with the paint worn off and the exposed metal shiney from use . I bet you could never lure it off them even with an exchange of a new one their that good ! . Ready to work day in day out with what ever work comes through the front door .

BIP
 

jeremiah

Well-Known Member
Yes. Very hard to find old machines built to sew through thick leather. Most of them are in shops around the world still doing what they were made to do.
 

Micawber

Well-Known Member
Designed and made in the days when things where built to last unlike so much of the modern gear.

Older and modern industrial / semi machines will do one job and do it well for years - if kept clean, lubricated and serviced. Domestic grade machines are often designed to do umpteen different things and run for short periods in light material.
 

Bombing IP

Well-Known Member
I am of the opinion that many machines can be converted to hand crank ,I am of course talking about machines from the 1920s to the 1960s metal machines . Many machines were converted for sailing boat use where repairs were needed at sea for sails . Of course a treadle machine would take up to much space and there was no electricity available so conversion kits were available . I have set up as a crank machine a Necchi Model 99 and Bernina 750 both functioned well . I used the handle from a hand crank drill ,this was fitted to the balance wheel with 2 screws and off we went .
hand crank dril.jpg


Like the handle above on the old hand crank drill . Seek help with the needle size and the thread size ,the thread has to fit in the channel in the needle to big of thread and you will have a hard time punching through smoothly . Get yourself a needle threader ,needles for leather a good work light to shine down on the needle area . As said before practice practice practice ,seek help when the underside of your patch looks like a rats nest .Adjust tensions via the bobbin holder and machine tensioner to see how this affects the holding together of the leather and the stitch look .

maxresdefault.jpg


I hope I have not scared you off making patches ,but its like when you first start to learn driving a car ,you think to your self how am I going to remember this all . Now when you drive to work you do not remember the journey ! .You can PM me if you need help .

Rgds BIP
 

wittmann

Active Member
Morning everyone,
I decided at weekend that I'll make the leather patches at the beginning only with hand-sewing, so I found following Hand-sewing set for leather. Could you guys maybe tell me whether it's suitable for amateur like me for leather hand-sewing? I'll appreciate!

PS: which Kind of Tools do i need additionally and necessarily? such as scissor and sharp leather knife to cut the leather with any shape?
where can i purchase the suitable leather for WWII style leather patches? Could you guys recommend any leather suppliers? Thanks for your reply!

Best regards
Lee

Leather handwork Tools


deluxe-handnaeh-set.jpg
 
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jeremiah

Well-Known Member
If your intending on hand sewing, you could get a pricking iron. Plot your holes out using that spacer tool then either use an awl or pricking iron and make the holes.
While you might have a thin enough leather to put the needle through, I’d still advice using the pricking irons. Your stitches will lay better. The stitch groover is not needed with the thin leather as that thing would take off enough leather to make the area to be sewn weaker.

Also need to be very careful with tension when hand sewing thin leather. It will stretch if too much tension and bunch up if not enough.

After typing this I actually do agree that a sewing machine for the patch is better if you have no experience hand sewing. Also need to use the lock stitch or saddle stitch if doing by hand.
 

Bombing IP

Well-Known Member
Whittman I have laid out extensively what I think and how it should be done and my opinions of how I do it . If you read carefully my posts no questions need to be answered it has all been covered .I wish you well on your endeavors I have no more to add .

BIP
 
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Cocker

Well-Known Member
I'll relay the opinion of Sean (which, IMHO, is one of the best, if not THE best, layered leather patch maker):

Wittman, go ahead with your own instincts by hand sewing etc. research the different leathers and just use common sense. I'm afraid the advice being offered while intended in your best interest is actually overkill. By the looks of it you just want to make a few here and there for your own jackets.
 
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