Some question on my n-2b and in general.

autopilot

New Member
Hi. Not long ago a n-2b jacket caught my eye and I had to get one. I've since been looking for info on these jackets and so I found this cool forum..

Few questions have come to my mind:

Im curious what kind of troops used these jackets and did they see battle?

Were they manufactured for civilians from the beginning or from later 70s?

Some maintanance questions:
Has anyone here tried to replace the fur hood trim (mine has dried up and falling to pieces)? Any tips welcome:) I have some new old fur to go with.
How should I store my jacket so this fur degredation would not happen again?

My jacket has a stamped code inside next to the zipper. I'm wonderinf it could be an aircraft serial code or a serial for a person?

-Aleksi
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B-Man2

Well-Known Member
Hi AP
Welcome to the forum !
That looks like a great jacket you have . It would make it a bit easier to see it and answer your questions if you would post some full size photos of it . Simply click the full image box next to the thumbnail box that you used to post your photos . I own an N-2B and I’ll try to answer your questions .
Cheers
 

B-Man2

Well-Known Member
That’s much better .. I see you have a Skyline made N-2b . Personally I think that’s one of the best manufactures who make this jacket. They seem to be heavier and warmer than most . So to begin ....your jacket is a military issued N-2b as opposed to the civilian version . Several companies made the civilian version of which “Alpha Industries” made quite a few of them . One of the differences in the military version is the inclusion of a heavy plastic type layer in the hood to keep the head dry . The fur around the hood was a coyote fur and if you obtain some additional fur , can be replaced . The only thing to keep the fur from degrading is to never store it wet . Let it dry naturally. The N number looks to be an aircraft number . We’ve seen a number of N-2bs and N-3bs that were like USNavy jackets that were assigned to a specific area of a ship such as the “watch” or the “deck operations” where men assigned to that area had the jackets there for their use, but would return them at the end of their shift . It cuts down on having to issue everyone foul weather gear. I had an N-3b that was assigned to and stenciled “Dental Ops “ . This is speculation on my part but this jacket may have been assigned to an aircraft, so you might do a Google check on that tail number . I hope that answered your questions .
 
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bazzer

Well-Known Member
Hi welcome it's a great place I own a black label skyline and white label as well see my older post



I have recently replaced the coyote fur use a stitch cutter to gently remove old fur trim then use as template

I used a leather feed under the new fur and allowed to fully dry before sewing on be care no to stain the nylon

Not sure how you will sew on fur but I would recommend a nylon sewing needle as nylon is easily torn by sewing machine

As B-man2 stated you got the best brand in my eyes as well
 
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bazzer

Well-Known Member
Forget to say it's nice just to introduce yourself on members bios just a little detail about yourself and what jackets your into etc
Baz
 

Ed Rooney

Well-Known Member
Flight crews and ground crews in cold weather. Normal flight gear is a summer flight jacket like a CWU-36/p and a winter one such as the CWU-45/p, but I was once issued a CWU-45/p and an N-2b with white faux fur in a colder climate.
 

autopilot

New Member
That’s much better .. I see you have a Skyline made N-2b . Personally I think that’s one of the best manufactures who make this jacket. They seem to be heavier and warmer than most . So to begin ....your jacket is a military issued N-2b as opposed to the civilian version . Several companies made the civilian version of which “Alpha Industries” made quite a few of them . One of the differences in the military version is the inclusion of a heavy plastic type layer in the hood to keep the head dry . The fur around the hood was a coyote fur and if you obtain some additional fur , can be replaced . The only thing to keep the fur from degrading is to never store it wet . Let it dry naturally. The N number looks to be an aircraft number . We’ve seen a number of N-2bs and N-3bs that were like USNavy jackets that were assigned to a specific area of a ship such as the “watch” or the “deck operations” where men assigned to that area had the jackets there for their use, but would return them at the end of their shift . It cuts down on having to issue everyone foul weather gear. I had an N-3b that was assigned to and stenciled “Dental Ops “ . This is speculation on my part but this jacket may have been assigned to an aircraft, so you might do a Google check on that tail number . I hope that answered your questions .
Thanks for the warm welcome and very informative post!
My jackets hood is very stiff. I thought maby the lamb skin (?) inside the hood was also dried up or something and hardened the hood, but that plastic type wet stopper might be the explonation.
As for the number N-9974 I did find one interesting google hit. Here is a link to the info I found:


"Delivered to the USAAF in May 1943 as 42-55984. Sold as N66099 in September 1946. To OO-EDS in June 1947. To N9974F in 1952 and returned to the USA via Ringway with the 'F' missing from its registration."

Don't know if that kind of aircraft is a possible match.. would be nice to know who used the jacked.
 

autopilot

New Member
Hi welcome it's a great place I own a black label skyline and white label as well see my older post



I have recently replaced the coyote fur use a stitch cutter to gently remove old fur trim then use as template

I used a leather feed under the new fur and allowed to fully dry before sewing on be care no to stain the nylon

Not sure how you will sew on fur but I would recommend a nylon sewing needle as nylon is easily torn by sewing machine

As B-man2 stated you got the best brand in my eyes as well
Hi, I checked your posts before I registered and got an answer to the same question I would have had about dating the jacket :) Very nice. I think I need a mint condition jacket in L-size too. My hands are a bit gorilla-style model so wouldn't mind a jacket with more arm lenght.
Nice to know you and B-man2 think skyline has maby the best quality N-2B's. I also love the quality of materials used. Love all thing wool.

Thanks for the fur trim replacing tips. I'll take those in account. Maby need to buy nylon string with right colour. The fur I'm going to use is some very old fur so should be dry.
 

usafwso

Member
Hi. Not long ago a n-2b jacket caught my eye and I had to get one. I've since been looking for info on these jackets and so I found this cool forum..

Few questions have come to my mind:

Im curious what kind of troops used these jackets and did they see battle?

Were they manufactured for civilians from the beginning or from later 70s?

Some maintanance questions:
Has anyone here tried to replace the fur hood trim (mine has dried up and falling to pieces)? Any tips welcome:) I have some new old fur to go with.
How should I store my jacket so this fur degredation would not happen again?

My jacket has a stamped code inside next to the zipper. I'm wonderinf it could be an aircraft serial code or a serial for a person?

-AleksiView attachment 56578View attachment 56579View attachment 56580View attachment 56581
The stamp that you see is typical USAF: The letter N is the the first letter of the owner last name, the for numbers are the last four numbers of that persons social security number. Think of it as a laundry mark or in this case a laundry mark. At one time when you sent your uniforms off to the dry cleaners on base, since all the uniforms look pretty much the same, you typically would use that stamp on your uniform clothing. Not sure if they do that now but we did it back in the 1980's and a bit beyond.
 

Ed Rooney

Well-Known Member
You can still buy old Army duffel bags with full name and SSN on eBay, in case you need an identity to assume.

The stamp that you see is typical USAF: The letter N is the the first letter of the owner last name, the for numbers are the last four numbers of that persons social security number. Think of it as a laundry mark or in this case a laundry mark. At one time when you sent your uniforms off to the dry cleaners on base, since all the uniforms look pretty much the same, you typically would use that stamp on your uniform clothing. Not sure if they do that now but we did it back in the 1980's and a bit beyond.
 
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