Repro Fabric Blood Chits

Smithy

Well-Known Member
I've said it before but it begs repeating...

One MAJORLY important thing that anyone after a period correct WWII era blood chit needs to be aware of, is make sure that the script is in the correct form, so traditional Chinese script and not the revised, simplified script which was popularised with the Cultural Revolution. Beware as many vendors offer blood chits with the later incorrect script.
 

B-Man2

Well-Known Member
I've said it before but it begs repeating...

One MAJORLY important thing that anyone after a period correct WWII era blood chit needs to be aware of, is make sure that the script is in the correct form, so traditional Chinese script and not the revised, simplified script which was popularised with the Cultural Revolution. Beware as many vendors offer blood chits with the later incorrect script.
Good info Tim
Is there any way we can we tell which is which?
 
I found this site very helpful when it came to explaining and showing original examples of blood chits.


I believe the ones that ausreenactor shared are the correct script and characters for the second variation of the Chinese Nationalist-made blood chits. I ordered one and will share some images when it arrives.
 
Received my repro Blood Chit from the seller that Ausreenactor linked to on eBay. I’m not totally unhappy with it, but it does seem to be way bigger than the original National government made chits. Those were, according to Last Hope (linked in my post on the CBI theatre website) they officially issued chits were 7 1/2 x 9 1/2. The repro is about 10X15. This would be workable as a non Chinese National blood chit if it didn’t have the stamp on it. I may attempt to make my own at this point. I have asked Sean if he is going to restock the cloth blood chits, but I have not seen them return to the store yet.
79E4EC1C-BC72-4AE3-A8F4-195BFDDD0B43.jpeg
 

ausreenactor

Well-Known Member
Check out the other vendors and perhaps you can educate them on an accurate size. Will elevate the standards of their products and what is available to collectors and re-enactment types...
 

kirova

Active Member
bit late to the party.

as a native Chinese speaker, some of the fonts on some repros out there can be a bit of hit and miss, most of the time the words/characthers are correct (I have yet to see any repros written in simplified Chinese), but the calligraphy can be a little off. Best way I could describe it is kinda like a kid's hand writing.

then again, looking at some of the historical examples from the book "Last Hope: The Blood Chit Story", some of the writers of those blood chits would probably get a smack on the wrist from their school teacher as well :p , so maybe the repro makers were just copying it directly from the originals?

IMHO, the hand writing/calligraphy of the ones below are pretty good (but maybe a little too perfect?)



this one's wording is quite different to the ones above, not sure if it is a repro of a real thing, or a modern invention (hand writing is good too):


these ones are a complete mess, I would've gotten detention if my home work looked like that :D:



anyway, not sure if you guys can tell the difference or not (just like if I am looking at Arabic or Hindi hand writing, I probably won't be able to tell the difference either), but I hope it helps :)
 

kirova

Active Member
I've said it before but it begs repeating...

One MAJORLY important thing that anyone after a period correct WWII era blood chit needs to be aware of, is make sure that the script is in the correct form, so traditional Chinese script and not the revised, simplified script which was popularised with the Cultural Revolution. Beware as many vendors offer blood chits with the later incorrect script.
best way to do it is to get your Chinese friends to verify both the script and the style of hand writing (although I have yet to see any blood chits written in simplified Chinese). if you don't know anyone Chinese, ask the local resturant owner lol
 
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Otter

Well-Known Member
I had one of the layered leather ones on an Aero jerky A2. I was wandering down Bytes Road in Glasgow when I realised someone was following me. When I checked behind I realised it was a Chinese lassie trying to read what was written on the chit. I still have the Burmese one on another jacket, but no one tries to read that one.
 
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