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Re arranging the "the cave" display case

Edward

Well-Known Member
I need display cases. right now its all on my desk and side table... and floor... nice benefit of living alone... the entire apartment is a man cave. LOL! I mean, what woman is going to allow me to hang a 1943 life preserver on the f'ing living room wall? LOL!

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Edward

Well-Known Member
Edward
Very nice collection!
Congrats!
Congrats on making a museum nobody else but me will see and congrats for racking up some debt! LOL! Well it’s a fun hobby and the hunt is a lot of fun! I’ve since sloweddown my collecting considerably though as I’m running out of room and money and quite frankly I’m just borrowing the stuff until it’s my turn to put it back on eBay! LOL!
 

Stony

Well-Known Member
Is that an original pack of Lucky Strikes green? I see them from time to time unopened.
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
mine are both unopened originals as well but my green pack predates WWII by 9 years so would have already been stale for wartime! lol! its got the rare red ink stamp with the actual date of December 1932. Now the unopened white pack is 1946 but.... and Carl might agree with me perhaps, if the company is like most manufacturers, they date by the fiscal year and I did corroborate this info at one website that suggested the stamp code on my pack can date mid 1945 to mid 1946 so I like to go with wartime mid 1945 LOL!
I have gone over them both with a magnifying glass to see if anyone slipped these into new cellophane wrappers but they look legit and original to me unless they are so skilled as to be able to repackage them perfectly which is entirely possible as original clear cellophane is usually found brittle and falling apart. Now that I look a second time I think the clear cellophane is too good to be true. I have read many will take old cigarette packs and put them in new clear wrappers. I'm not a serious cigarette pack collector anyway and just wanted the look for my collection.

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Smithy

Well-Known Member
I gave up smoking on July 12th 2016 but if you'd given me one of those before then I would have done my duty and smoked it despite the 70-80 year gap ;-)

I can't remember if I mentioned this here but I come from Auckland in NZ. During the war there were several very large US military bases around the city as it was a staging point for the war in the Pacific. It was also usual for families who were able in the area to these camps to billet US servicemen for periods so they might have a bit of "home life" before being sent off to the Pacific. My grandfather made their house available for US personnel to be billeted and my Dad who was born in 1928 always fondly remembered the "Yanks" who lived in their house for periods. They used to help around the house and bring chocolate, stockings and cigarettes and other goodies. The reason why I brought this up was the first cigarettes my Dad started smoking were US issue ones like Luckies, Old Gold and Chesterfield. My Dad also learnt to dance all the swing stuff from the Americans at their home.

Sadly I can't remember now all the names of the guys who lived at my Dad's place (Dad died back in 2012 so unfortunately I can't ask him) during that time except for one who was IIRC Huey Jamison (I have no idea if the spelling is correct as it's just how my Dad remembered it) who stepped on a landmine at Iwo Jima and was killed.

My Dad was a great fan of Americans from this and especially had a fondness for thick American style pancakes after these guys used to try and make them for our family using whatever was at hand due to rationing.

Sorry for the long-winded post but the old WWII smokes reminded me of all of this.
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
I gave up smoking on July 12th 2016 but if you'd given me one of those before then I would have done my duty and smoked it despite the 70-80 year gap ;-)
HA! HA! HA!

I can't remember if I mentioned this here but I come from Auckland in NZ. During the war there were several very large US military bases around the city as it was a staging point for the war in the Pacific. It was also usual for families who were able in the area to these camps to billet US servicemen for periods so they might have a bit of "home life" before being sent off to the Pacific. My grandfather made their house available for US personnel to be billeted and my Dad who was born in 1928 always fondly remembered the "Yanks" who lived in their house for periods. They used to help around the house and bring chocolate, stockings and cigarettes and other goodies. The reason why I brought this up was the first cigarettes my Dad started smoking were US issue ones like Luckies, Old Gold and Chesterfield. My Dad also learnt to dance all the swing stuff from the Americans at their home.

Sadly I can't remember now all the names of the guys who lived at my Dad's place (Dad died back in 2012 so unfortunately I can't ask him) during that time except for one who was IIRC Huey Jamison (I have no idea if the spelling is correct as it's just how my Dad remembered it) who stepped on a landmine at Iwo Jima and was killed.

My Dad was a great fan of Americans from this and especially had a fondness for thick American style pancakes after these guys used to try and make them for our family using whatever was at hand due to rationing.

Sorry for the long-winded post but the old WWII smokes reminded me of all of this.

wow! amazing stuff right there! nice to get a generation pass down of actual wartime history! so cool!
 

Smithy

Well-Known Member
Dad always had the fondest memories of the US guys who stayed with them at home. He always said how kind, helpful and fun they were. He also always preferred American cigarettes when he still smoked and like I said had a very big soft spot for American style pancakes!
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
Dad always had the fondest memories of the US guys who stayed with them at home. He always said how kind, helpful and fun they were. He also always preferred American cigarettes when he still smoked and like I said had a very big soft spot for American style pancakes!
I too have a soft spot for American pancakes... the big ole soft spot right in the middle of my abdomen! LOL!
 

Smithy

Well-Known Member
I too have a soft spot for American pancakes... the big ole soft spot right in the middle of my abdomen! LOL!
One of the nice things Edward is when traditions run down through families. I inherited a love for American pancakes/flapjacks from my Dad and now my kids have too.

We have a holiday here tomorrow and the kids have already asked if they can have for breakfast "American pancakes" with maple syrup, bananas and bacon.

Making these wouldn't exist in our family without those US servicemen who stayed with my Dad's family. I know it's probably silly but I find it nice that an enjoyment of something that was passed down from a few GIs who lived with my Dad's family in the 40s is still around today with my offspring.
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
One of the nice things Edward is when traditions run down through families. I inherited a love for American pancakes/flapjacks from my Dad and now my kids have too.

We have a holiday here tomorrow and the kids have already asked if they can have for breakfast "American pancakes" with maple syrup, bananas and bacon.

Making these wouldn't exist in our family without those US servicemen who stayed with my Dad's family. I know it's probably silly but I find it nice that an enjoyment of something that was passed down from a few GIs who lived with my Dad's family in the 40s is still around today with my offspring.
thats fantastic! a tradition and a little something the boys left behind to be remembered by... they would be smiling ear to ear to know your kids ask for that for breakfast!!!! so awesome! I think I too will have pancakes, maple syrup, bananas and bacon for breakfast... yup, I'm gonna call it the GI Breakfast!
 
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