Original Cable 42-10008P For Your Review.

Silver Surfer

Well-Known Member
I can't tell ya how many times ive gone to look at a-2s stored in an Attics that were hardened, and dry rotted to the point of no return. for some reason this was most often in Texas and the south west. no bs. conversely, the same can be said of original a-2s stored in damp basements, and just plain moldy and rotten to the point of disintegration. this storage method was [is] the choice of folks on the eastern seaboard, and florida. I reckon that back in the day, and to some degree still, storage of old wwll gear just wasn't considered important enough to take care with for some folks. besides time and wear, this would help to explain the near scarcity of solid a-2s still around today.
 

Tattoo A2

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure where you live, or what sort of attic you have, or how the jackets are sealed up, but after cleaning out my father's attic a couple years ago -- I know it's not the greatest place to store things. Lots of dried out items he was "saving," including old leather shoes that were un-savable.
They dont stay up there long, and are all watched very carefully, doing work downstairs so they have been put up there temporarily until my closet space has returned. Im very OCD with my collection so they are always under my watch. One quick question, I took some photos of the originals this morning on my cell, Is it better to send them to my email on small, medium, large or actual size so I can make them bigger on here, Im not too good with these things, Thanks
 

Chandler

Well-Known Member
Is it better to send them to my email on small, medium, large or actual size so I can make them bigger on here, Im not too good with these things, Thanks
To me, that all depends on how (or if) you edit them. I always use Photoshop on my desktop for editing, so I save as "actual" size for editing then interpolate for resolution -- but I save as JPEGs in a high mode.

I know, probably all foreign words, but more info in your picture equals more detail to see.
 

Tattoo A2

Well-Known Member
To me, that all depends on how (or if) you edit them. I always use Photoshop on my desktop for editing, so I save as "actual" size for editing then interpolate for resolution -- but I save as JPEGs in a high mode.

I know, probably all foreign words, but more info in your picture equals more detail to see.
Thanks for the info, I better call one of the grandkids for tech support,lol. This technology really confuses me to death.
 

saucerfiend

Well-Known Member
Rob
If you happen to come across them I’d love to see them and compare them to this one. This one’s a size 40 so I’ll never be able to wear it any place but I like it for the history of the jacket . Still I can’t help wishing it was a size 46 or 48.
What sizes are yours ?
Ah Hah! I thought so.
 

Tattoo A2

Well-Known Member
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Silver Surfer

Well-Known Member
if ya decide to have Steve replace the zipper, source a brass 1940s Conmar zipper [used on cables] as there is no way on earth that you will find a kwik zipper for it. mid brown wool elements from Larry on eb. all in all, the jacket looks to be pretty nice, but the darkness at the collar fold would indicate that the hides there may be stiff due to sweat. a Vaseline application may be in order in that area.
 

Tattoo A2

Well-Known Member
if ya decide to have Steve replace the zipper, source a brass 1940s Conmar zipper [used on cables] as there is no way on earth that you will find a kwik zipper for it. mid brown wool elements from Larry on eb. all in all, the jacket looks to be pretty nice, but the darkness at the collar fold would indicate that the hides there may be stiff due to sweat. a Vaseline application may be in order in that area.
Its actually very soft in the collar as well as the rest of the jacket, It is probably for 80 plus years of neck sweat thah discolored it a bit. Found this one on Ebay a few years back under mens raincoats, Cable raincoat co. lol..for 400 bucks I danced for days,lol.
 

blackrat2

Well-Known Member
Thanks for a great post Burt and those who have added to it with additional pictures and invaluable knowledge on originals of the Cable jacketes
 

Tattoo A2

Well-Known Member
H
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ere is my Cable 27753 which I believe is horsehide. Its appears to have had a nametag and 2 different squadron patches on it at one time or another. All original knits and zipper, and remnants of a cock eyed AAF decal thats about as straight as the leaning tower of Pisa.
 

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Lorenzo_l

Well-Known Member
It’s been pretty slow around here for the last few days, so I thought posting an original vintage A2 might generate some interest and conversation. I obtained this jacket from Vic ( Silver Surfer) a few months ago and this is the first time that I’ve actually posted it for discussion. It’s a Cable Raincoat Co 42-10008P contract A2.

HISTORY
The Cable 42-10008P A2 contract was issued in January of 1942 for a relatively small quantity of 10,000 jackets. The cost per jacket was $7.75 and the value of the entire contract was $77,500 dollars. This was the 2nd of three contracts that were issued to Cable Clothing Co, which was located in Boston, Massachusetts. The jacket is made from a very thick goatskin and is almost indistinguishable from Horsehide do to the thickness. The jacket is made without a collar stand and has a Conmar zipper which while not the norm, was an original option for this contract.
( Footnote: Thanks to Gary Eastman and his Type A2 Flight Jacket Identification Manual for portions of this information)

So that’s some of the history of the Manufacturing of this jacket and now a brief synopsis about the original owner.
T/Sgt William Heuser was part of an air crew on a B-24 Liberator Heavy Bomber. He is pictured below with his crew, on leave and in his final resting place. See belowView attachment 82402
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I hope to be able to do additional research and find out more about this gentleman.

Photos
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Thanks, Burt, for a great review on a wearable original and a piece of history. There is a sizeable database of original A-2s in G-1s that have been reviewed over the years on VLJ. That only increases the added value of this forum as a leaning resource.
 
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