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my latest acquisitions

ausreenactor

Well-Known Member
I have a khaki Bancroft Flighter purchased for a song from our own beloved 'Andrew'. And a Diamond Dave OD repro. Fitted a genuine large Eagle insignia soon after I got it. Great cap.
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
Ed
Nice looking display, you're rapidly developing your own little museum there...;)
the hunt is fun. the acquisition is fun, the receiving of item is fun, the displaying and viewing of item is fun... getting the credit card bill... not so much fun. :eek: :D

I started out telling a friend of mine "I am NOT a museum" and I had to keep reminding myself of that... now when I talk or text I just tell him I added a new artifact to my museum. :p
 

B-Man2

Well-Known Member
Just need a B-17
There's a video on You Tube of a British guy who was given a original WW II Spitfire rivet for his birthday 40 years or more ago.
From that rivet he started to collect original Spitfire parts or have the ones not available any longer produced. It took him all that time to obtain all the parts but today he owns a working, flying Spitfire.....now he cant fly..but that's not point.... the moral is never give up hope ;)
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
There's a video on You Tube of a British guy who was given a original WW II Spitfire rivet for his birthday 40 years or more ago.
From that rivet he started to collect original Spitfire parts or have the ones not available any longer produced. It took him all that time to obtain all the parts but today he owns a working, flying Spitfire.....now he cant fly..but that's not point.... the moral is never give up hope ;)
That’s insane!!!! So cool!
 

Edward

Well-Known Member
Check it out

thats amazing! I'm following the progress of Hanger Thirteen in Asheville, NC blog and FB posts and they are going to extremes to find and acquire the most smallest of details for their B-17 restoration. their research is exhaustive and painstaking but once done it will be the single most perfectly accurate restoration since the Memphis Belle. its amazing how much work goes into it so I can't imagine building piece by piece a working spitfire!
 

Micawber

Well-Known Member
I can vouch for stories like that guy and his Spit. When I was growing up there was a chap who had a complete, but disassembled Spitfire in his garage that he was slowly, oh so slowly, single handedly restoring. We lost contact with him but saw him in the local press some years later beside the now more complete looking a/c. This would be 40-45-50 years ago so very much doubt it's the same one in that clap.
 

Edward

Well-Known Member

to give you an idea of how much attention to detail these guys are putting into their B-17 check this out:

(one of)...the most distinguishing aspect of the B-17’s interior is the aluminum identification stamps. These markings were placed on aluminum sheets by the milling companies as a means of product identification. Until recently, these markings could only be seen aircraft that survived the war completely unaltered – more often than not, this usually meant wreck-sites. However, the recent growing trends toward historical accuracy have brought a renewed effort to replicate these markings.

The most common of these markings reads “ALCLAD 24S-T AN-A-13.” “Alclad” is a trademarked term that has entered popular lexicon, but essentially it refers to a high strength aluminum alloy coated with a thin surface layer of high-purity aluminum. In this case, the “24” refers to the use of copper in the alloy, the “S” to indicate that it is a wrought material (can be shaped by rolling, drawing, etc.), the “T” that it is tempered (i.e., heat-treated), and “AN-A-13” to its specification: Army-Navy Aeronautical 13 (a specification common to 1942/1943 production aircraft).

In the interest of being as accurate as possible, we at Hangar Thirteen have worked to recreate these identification stamps. The wartime examples that we have use a particular serif font that was common to aluminum made by Alcoa of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania – the original copyright holder on ALCLAD. We scanned this font and cleaned it, copying not only the lettering but the spacing of the letters as well. All that remains is to find a way to apply it.

The fact that the lines of text alternate between “ALCLAD 24S-T AN-A-13” and “ALCLAD 24S-T” complicates matters. We lack the funds and space to invest in an industrial stamping machine. As such, the most promising option is to use a hand-printer. Looking very much like a handheld tape roller, a hand-printer allows its user to stamp a product by simply rolling the applicator against the material’s surface. We have priced these hand-rollers and while, they are somewhat expensive, they are no doubt the best option available to us. If you would like to help us by investing in these two hand-printers, by all means, do not hesitate to contact us.

Aluminum-Markings.jpg

A wartime factory photo where the Alclad markings are clearly visible.
 
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