My first original g1 care question

Micawber

Well-Known Member
Lord, VLJ really needs a sticky thread about the pros and cons of the various commonly used / popular leather treatments because the subject comes up and subsequent info gets rehashed with with regular monotony.

Not having a dig at anyone but this is worse than the BBC for repeats.
 

Chandler

Well-Known Member
Lord, VLJ really needs a sticky thread about the pros and cons of the various commonly used / popular leather treatments because the subject comes up and subsequent info gets rehashed with with regular monotony.

Not having a dig at anyone but this is worse than the BBC for repeats.
Good thing you don't check boot blogs. :D

But let me second a sticky thread, as long as it's legit information.
 
Last edited:

Grant

Well-Known Member
FWIW I've used Pecards Antique Leather Dressing successfully for years on vintage USN goatskins from WWII to Vietnam era. As others have said, it's important to use sparingly. I gently rub it into the leather, let it soak in for a day or two, then wipe away any excess with a clean cotton cloth. It works especially well with goatskin that's dried and become stiff.
 

Chandler

Well-Known Member
Then wipe away any excess with a clean cotton cloth.
Definitely a key step not to leave out.

I've used the Pecards on my 50s G-1 as well. Softened it some, but nothing buttery. Only seen a little bloom, and it was easy to buff out.
 

dinomartino1

Well-Known Member
I have used pecards and nothing wrong with it but I prefer Vaseline as it's less sticky and gooey and has has the added advantage of being available nearly anywhere and cheap, John chapman uses Vaseline.
 

Wedge417

Member
My two bit of advice having to maintain old leather that's part of my 40s collection (note these are thick ww1 and ww2 leathers) I find the saphir milk or universal cream works well. It's a traditional naturally obtained mix with jojoba and other good stuff for your leather.
It's a white bottle with either a green or blue tag with the brand name. It should be easy to source online.

I have found that either this cream or Saphir "renovator" works well in hydrating the leather to a degree where it gets that supple feel back.

For really dry leather or damaged leather I would recommend either neatsfoot oil or a dubbin cream. The natural kind. Try to stay away from synthetic mix as they can damage the leather in the long term.
Once again Saphir is my go to brand.

Their "alpine" dubbin cream is good if used with restraint as it can get the leather to be a bit sticky. That'd be a good option as a final coat to protect and weather-proof your leather.
 
Top