My first original g1 care question

PilatusPilot

Active Member
Hey guys, it's my only original jacket, and I've been wondering if it's possible to make the leather soft again? It's just over pretty stiff and it took the shape of the previous pilot that was wearing it. Ive read a few posts here but none really showed a very old jacket being turned into soft leather again. Is there some magical way? Or am I living in a dream world hahaha let me know if you guys have any tips and tricks.
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Chandler

Well-Known Member
I have a 50s G-1 that I've treated with Pecards Vintage dressing every couple years -- still not as soft as a new jacket. Probably just the nature of owning an older jacket -- it just dries out a little over time.

Not sure about a petroleum jelly treatment for leather.
 

PilatusPilot

Active Member
I have a 50s G-1 that I've treated with Pecards Vintage dressing every couple years -- still not as soft as a new jacket. Probably just the nature of owning an older jacket -- it just dries out a little over time.

Not sure about a petroleum jelly treatment for leather.
Yes that's what I've been thinking. There's no way around it. But I just want to make it a little softer so it molds more to my shape and gets less of a "stiff canvas" look. It has some really sharp edges hahahaha
 

Micawber

Well-Known Member
Ah the old leather treatment question again :) Lots of pre existing threads on here contain lots of info and views on preferred treatments. Main thing is use them sparingly, very sparingly and as Burt says "just wear the piss out of it". The more you wear a leather jacket the better it will become.
 

Chandler

Well-Known Member
Pecards without doubt!
A while back there was concern that Pecards was leading to overt "blooming" on leather jackets. Is this still a worry?

I use their "Vintage" dressing (sparingly, @Micawber ), but I've had a little blooming with it. Nothing that isn't easily remedied with a little light cleaning and buffing, but still a little concerning.
 

entertainment

Well-Known Member
I was always about wary about petroleum jelly, but then I read this blog post on the Pecard website.
Apparently the main ingredient in Pecard Leather Dressing is petrolatum which is the same thing as petroleum jelly. Pecard just compounds it with other things though the safety sheets that I looked at don't say what. In the section on pets eating Pecard, it does mention beeswax.

I used Pecard on a Breier G-1 from the late fifties and have had no problems with blooming after seven years. Your mileage may vary.
 
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johnwayne

Well-Known Member
I used it on my Cagleco ‘57 and can't say I noticed anything untoward - never needed it on anything else though but initially did a small test area then happily carried on. Im sure there are general leather conditioners like saddle soap too but Pecards was the overall consensus here some time back and although I don't recall it was cheap one tub goes a long way!
 

Chandler

Well-Known Member
I was always about wary about petroleum jelly, but then I read this blog post on the Pecard website.
Apparently the main ingredient in Pecard Leather Dressing is petrolatum which is the same thing as petroleum jelly. Pecard just compounds it with other things though the safety sheets that I looked at don't say what. In the section on pets eating Pecard, it does mention beeswax.

I used Pecard on a Breier G-1 from the late fifties and have had no problems with blooming after seven years. Your mileage may vary.
I missed this info from the other day -- hadn't seen Pecards uses petroleum distillates, but there it is on the side of my tub. Maybe this is why I'm getting "blooming" on my G&B goat A-2? Then again, I've used it on some of my other jackets with no trouble.

Maybe I'll switch to a neatsfoot oil blend like the Red Wing leather cream I use on my boots. Then again, I also have a tub of Danner Boot Dressing, but I think it's just re-labeled Pecards.

Very confusing.
 

mulceber

Well-Known Member
Does Vaseline ever really dry? And if it does, doesn't it become something akin to dried bread dough?

Thats’s why you use very light coats. The idea isn’t for it to dry, it’s supposed to get absorbed. None of these products really dries.

I put my vote behind petroleum jelly (AKA Vaseline) as well. Vic advised me to do it on an original A-2 I bought from him a couple years ago, and I’ve used it on every old leather jacket I’ve bought since. No regrets. Just be REALLY sparing with it. If you think you’ve used enough, you’ve probably used too much. You can always add a second or even third coat later.
 
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