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Ja Dubow 27798 (Platon) A-2 jacket review and pics

mulceber

Well-Known Member
All of these are good suggestions, but I really think you should post fit pics first. When I first got my jacket I also was like “it’s too small!” Turns out I was just not used to how an A-2 should fit. That isn’t necessarily your situation, but I think it’s worth getting an opinion from the kind folks on here before you make your final decision.
 

Julius

Active Member
I am 5'8' 160 pounds thick through the shoulders I usually wear a size 40 in modern jackets. I have been trying to find a comfortable fitting A2 and was hoping this would be it.
Man, if you got size 42 it's already one size up from what you actually need. And you think it's small?

Turns out I was just not used to how an A-2 should fit.
My guess is you 're in the same situation as Mulceber above, but we better see your fit pics before anything else can be said.
 

mulceber

Well-Known Member
I also just don’t think an A-2 jacket is something you should be able to fit a sweatshirt under, at least not a sweatshirt with a modern fit. If you can, the jacket’s probably too big. Regardless of what the fit pics look like, Mike should probably plan on buying a more modern fit of jacket for layering. A bunch of Ken’s non-military offerings (like the highwayman) would fit the bill.
 
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jeremiah

Well-Known Member
If you want a wartime fit then no sweatshirt. If you want a practical article of clothing, fitting a light sweater, flannel or sweat shirt under for layering , you’d want some extra room.

leather is not an insulator.

That said there was a reason some contracts were roomier or less roomier on the same size.
 

Smithy

Well-Known Member
If you can fit more than a shirt and a C-2 sweater thing then it's probably too big. Remember the A-2 wasn't meant to be a cold temperature flight jacket, it's basically just a windcheater. If you're looking for warmth and a 1944 sort of vibe then consider a B-10. And I agree with the others if you want an A-2 jacket to wear a modern hoodie under, then you don't actually want a proper A-2, it just wasn't designed to wear a lot of thick bulky layers underneath it.

Get an A-2 to wear at most, a thin sweater/jumper under like a C-2, get another jacket to layer thicker clothing under, or get a B-10, B-15, etc.
 

jeremiah

Well-Known Member
I normally wear my BK arco with a shirt but can fit a flannel under it. I don’t wear sweaters much.
I deal with the difference in temperature like a man. (Complaining how cold it is but too stubborn to get something warmer on.)
 

Smithy

Well-Known Member
I actually got away with wearing an A-2 in the coldest temps I've ever worn one last winter. It was -5 Celsius and I had on an A-2, a knock off C-2 sweater, thermal long sleeved T-shirt, scarf and A-10 gloves - no wind though. I was probably right on the absolute limit for an A-2 for me.
 

Smithy

Well-Known Member
Problem here Jeremiah is we get a lot of wind (it's probably the windiest place in Norway and it's not uncommon for winds here during storms to hit hurricane strength) and combined with minus temperatures being inside the Arctic Circle. So if it's really blowing and really cold you actually need a proper parka. When it gets really bad even my Irvin doesn't cut the mustard and I have to use a Canada Goose.
 

Smithy

Well-Known Member
Don't blame you Grant.

Wind chill is the killer here because of the extreme winds we have. Over winter they can be actually pretty dangerous due to how much they drop the effective temperature (which can be pretty cold being inside the Arctic) and if you are outside for a long time. I remember a few years back the second time we lived in Norway and were at one of the family cabins/cottages up in the mountains and a massive storm blew in. There were two Italian tourists not far from us who had gone on a day trip up in the mountains but didn't have the right gear when the storm hit. One froze to death and the other lost most of his fingers and toes.
 
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