J.A. Dubow manufacturing co 2014 - 2021

busdrivermike

Well-Known Member
There's also the issue of exclusivity boosting appeal. We bigger guys are assumed to be a poor image for anything halfway stylish or youthful, regardless of how well we might wear clothes.
High end workwear stops at 46/40 if it's a US/Euro brand (regardless of where made), and 44/38 if a Far East brand.
It’s has proven at times true , the brand Abercrombie and Fitch has said publicly they will never
Make xl or xxl clothes for larger sized women as they don’t want overweight people wearing their clothes
Most companies won’t publicly state that , it’s rare to have brutal honesty.
I gotta say that I’m not offended as it allows purveyors like 5 star or others like San Diego leather factory
Fill the void , and they both from my experience will give you custom options which is actually for me the
Route I would go anyway, as like my personal custom options, like an interior pocket and maybe a different
Liner.
 

zoomer

Well-Known Member
A & F is the epitome of fickle, trash-fash merchandising. I'm certain the current owners don't choose to represent any image of style or quality to live up to, but just to degrade an old name in a symbolic way - to flaunt the victory of disposable brand culture over the substance of tradition.

Anyone taking cues from A & F had better be in their same throw-away-chic market sector, or else their heads are some ways up their behinds.
 

Bombing IP

Well-Known Member
The Abercrombie and Fitch did a complete turnaround in 1988 when it was bought out ,pre 1988 it was the epitome of exclusivity and high end products for the well heeled .Today its a very different company selling junk and crap a different type of GAP store gone is the wonderful store you could spend all day in and never see it all .Today it makes twice what it paid for the company in a year ,there giving the masses what they want and keeping China Busy at the same time .
 

jdgloverjr

New Member
The Abercrombie and Fitch did a complete turnaround in 1988 when it was bought out ,pre 1988 it was the epitome of exclusivity and high end products for the well heeled .Today its a very different company selling junk and crap a different type of GAP store gone is the wonderful store you could spend all day in and never see it all .Today it makes twice what it paid for the company in a year ,there giving the masses what they want and keeping China Busy at the same time .
I used to enjoy looking at the products from the old A&F, back when they were more of an outfitter type store. Think a high-end Cabelas. I never could afford anything from their product line, but I did enjoy the styling of their clothing. It seemed more traditional mid-century tweeds, etc., if I recall correctly. However, it seems they've hit a downturn, as the local A&F in my shopping mall just now closed up shop one day, with absolutely no notice. Here yesterday, gone today. Good riddance as far as I'm concerned, as the current store was mostly overpriced, hipster junk.
 

Bombing IP

Well-Known Member
There was also a shooting range in the NY store ,I seem to remember an incident with Earnest Hemingway re the range .I will have to research it .

BIP
 

Chandler

Well-Known Member
I wonder who has the old sister brand Von Lengerke & Antoine. They were A & F's Chicago outlet. The Capone mob used to go down to the basement shooting range to try out the latest in heaters. Bob Newhart worked there in the 50s, and has a great story to tell.
I remember going to the A&F Chicago store in the Loop, somewhere in the mid to late '70s. Was that the same store?

Surprised my friend and his father didn't mention the range; big outdoors guys. Maybe it was gone by then?
 

zoomer

Well-Known Member
This blog says the VL & A name was phased out in favor of A & F during the '60s. No word about the range.

The blog has some great catalog pages from VL & A, worth checking out.
 

zoomer

Well-Known Member
The Abercrombie and Fitch did a complete turnaround in 1988 when it was bought out ,pre 1988 it was the epitome of exclusivity and high end products for the well heeled .
They were running on hard times since the '70s, having closed their stores.

The 1988 buyout was masterminded by Les (The Limited) Wexner, since notorious for his mentorship of Jeffrey Epstein.
 
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