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Hartmann or Luftwaffe repros...Repros or pure inventions...

Swedish_Pilot

New Member
“Hartmann “ Luftwaffe repro ...View attachment 15802 View attachment 15801 View attachment 15800 Hartmann repro made by a little french artisan...View attachment 15799 Just found this one, wanted to show it, since I see lot on crapbay and elswhere about so- called Luftwaffe or so called Hartmann vests ( originals all private purchases sure...but nowadays “fakes” = lousy copies or inventions at best...are so off tracks, one can wonder whether those “inventors” ever saw a photo or an original....from the 30ies/40ies...)
Found this repro which I really like...looks 100% like my WW2 originals...by all means. It has like the WW2 ones...: Cotton thread, nickel brass Eclair zips , ( no molded Swiss RiRi or YKK or others) , D- rings waist adjusters, chrome plated magnetic front buckle ( no funny stainless steel buckle), wooden pocket flap buttons, coton/blanket liner, most importantly the right proportion of pockets via torso, no breast or back seams....& last but not least ...no handwarmers.
Hi!
It's a really great jacket!
I'm planning to tailor make a "Hartmann" jacket and I wonder if you please could tell me the width or length of the two chest zippers?

Best regards,
Swedish_Pilot
 

B-Man2

Well-Known Member
Earl......buddy.......Pal .....I hate to be the one that always keeps asking, but if you don’t tell us what maker it is , and we really like the jacket , we’ll never know where to look for one.
BTW .... it looks great on you . You nailed the fit!!
 

Pilot

Well-Known Member
My experience...
800 Euro for ex-stock test jackets...if available...( only small frame test jackets available... if still so...)
Made on order : 1200 +++ Euro... Waiting list for larger than 42“ chest : 11-12 months after full payment.
But feel free to ask directly...
Shipping goes extra... no Paypal only IBAN ... the last according to an add. on TFL..
 
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Earloffunk

Well-Known Member
Been thinking about the "French cyclist jackets" being used by the Luftwaffe pilots and a question came to my mind: how did the guys on the eastern front get their jackets? Not all pilots went to France during their career before being deployed somewhere else.
 

Pilot

Well-Known Member
It was organised by friends or family...
Besides some "Kaufhäuser" "Warenhäuser" the very few "malls" also had them available since purchased from French makers ...same as for other French made products...Cognac, wines etc...
 

Earloffunk

Well-Known Member
Thanks - makes sense.

You see I have no idea about the simple things in life back then (not to mention the not so easy things...)
 

Earloffunk

Well-Known Member
No, its true. I have never had any interest in everyday (civilian) life in that era - but thinking about how people got along then seems to be worth some research. Sadly my grandparents never told any stories about that time. The only things they said was how hard it was to make a living (in general, no details). Well they told me some short episodes like how they met and what it was like to be a POW - but again: no details just general statements. I guess I should go and ask my grandmothers while I still can... My grandfathers also never really wanted to talk about their time in the military: one was a fighter pilot very late in the war and when they ran out of fighters he did some ground combat . The other one was taken POW in Italy but never really talked about this time too much - just how he regrets he and his squad had been captured because he did not take care that their hiding place (don't know the correct term - its not a "Gruppennest") was kept secret (the Brits found them because they had left wound dressings on the path that was close to their hiding place).
 

Pilot

Well-Known Member
No, its true. I have never had any interest in everyday (civilian) life in that era - but thinking about how people got along then seems to be worth some research. Sadly my grandparents never told any stories about that time. The only things they said was how hard it was to make a living (in general, no details). Well they told me some short episodes like how they met and what it was like to be a POW - but again: no details just general statements. I guess I should go and ask my grandmothers while I still can... My grandfathers also never really wanted to talk about their time in the military: one was a fighter pilot very late in the war and when they ran out of fighters he did some ground combat . The other one was taken POW in Italy but never really talked about this time too much - just how he regrets he and his squad had been captured because he did not take care that their hiding place (don't know the correct term - its not a "Gruppennest") was kept secret (the Brits found them because they had left wound dressings on the path that was close to their hiding place).
Wow!
"Gruppennest" : Hideout
 

Southoftheborder

Active Member
No, its true. I have never had any interest in everyday (civilian) life in that era - but thinking about how people got along then seems to be worth some research. Sadly my grandparents never told any stories about that time. The only things they said was how hard it was to make a living (in general, no details). Well they told me some short episodes like how they met and what it was like to be a POW - but again: no details just general statements. I guess I should go and ask my grandmothers while I still can... My grandfathers also never really wanted to talk about their time in the military: one was a fighter pilot very late in the war and when they ran out of fighters he did some ground combat . The other one was taken POW in Italy but never really talked about this time too much - just how he regrets he and his squad had been captured because he did not take care that their hiding place (don't know the correct term - its not a "Gruppennest") was kept secret (the Brits found them because they had left wound dressings on the path that was close to their hiding place).
Not talking about the war - if you forgive the Fawlty Towers reference - was pretty common an all sides. My father hardly said anything about his war time service until it all caught up with him in the seventies. Then he suddenly broke down and was told he had delayed PTSD after decades of suppression. He was told that catharsis would help him deal with the memories and that was when he started to open up. It wasn't exactly a surprise though as often acted like a raving madman in the years after the war when I was a small child.

You should ask your grandmother. I regret not talking more to my mother and aunts about the past. When they're dead and gone it's too late.


 
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