Cosmonauts

dinomartino1

Well-Known Member
Soyuz TM-13, Mir EO-4
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Soviet cosmonaut Aleksandr Volkov wore this jacket as part of a shirt-sleeves flight suit during his 175 day mission on board the Soviet space station Mir that began with his October 1991 launch on board Soyuz TM-13. This was Volkov's thrid flight into space and the final launch by the Soviet Union as the country broke up in December 1991. Mission planners supplied the crew with an assortment of track suit type clothes because cosmonauts and astronauts found it easier to live in work in space in clothes similar to those that they wore on Earth. The fabric of the clothes has been checked for flamablity as well as comfort.

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These protective goggles were part of Aleksei Leonov's gear that he used while in service to the U.S.S.R. cosmonaut corps and Air Force. Leonov became famous in March 1965, when he opened the hatch to his Voskhod 2 spacecraft while it was orbiting the Earth and climbed out, to perform the world's first walk in space.

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Soviet cosmonaut Vladimir Lyakhov wore this flight suit in training for his mission on board the space stations Salyut 7 in 1983 and the Mir in 1988. During space station missions, cosmonauts and astronauts wear comfortable, shirt sleeves clothes that allow them to do meaningful work while inside that station. Lyakhov launched to the Salyut on board Soyuz T-9 on 27 June and returned to Earth in November. His next mission was to Mir in 1988. That mission lasted for about one week.

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Soviet cosmonaut Yury Malyshev wore this flight suit during his first spaceflight on board Soyuz T-2, en route to the Salyut 6 space station. This suit is designed to ameliorate the debilitating effects of prolonged microgravity on the skeletal muscular system experienced during prolonged periods in microgravity. Inside the suit is an elaborate system of cords and straps that can be arranged to simulate gravity pulling on muscles. In all likelihood this was an early prototype of the concept and Malyshev was on in orbit for three days.

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These fur-lined survival boots are part of Aleksei Leonov's survival gear that he used while in service to the U.S.S. R. cosmonaut corps and Air Force. As a pilot, he would use these boots if forced to land his aircraft in a cold climate. Leonov become famous in March 1965, when he opened the hatch to his Voskhod 2 spacecraft while it was orbiting the Earth and climbed out, to perform the world's first walk in space.

After his 1965 flight, Leonov became an ambassador for spaceflight and traveled throughout the world to tell his story about his historic mission. Unlike the American astronauts, the Soviet cosmonauts retained their military rank and status while they served in the cosmonaut corps. Even the lone woman in the corps, Valentina Tereshkova, obtained a military rank during the course of her service. Among the early cosmonauts of the 1960s, only one, Konstantin Feoktistov did not receive a military commission. For those reasons, Leonov's military uniform is a symbol of the close relationship that the Soviet space program had with the Ministry of Defense.
 

dinomartino1

Well-Known Member
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Sokol KV-2 (Falcon) pressure suit patch
The patch depicts the Russian Aerospace Agency logo and typically decorates the spacesuits of all Russian cosmonauts and their guests on board the space station. It has a white background with blue, yellow, and red trim. The edge is embroidered blue with yellow embroidery on the inside. The Russian initials of are at the top with the full Russian names Rosaviakosmos written out below.

Soviet cosmonaut Anatoly Berezovoy wore this jacket as part of a shirt-sleeves flight suit during his 211 day mission to the Salyut 7 space station. Berezovoy flew to the station along with his flight engineer Valentin Lebedev as part of the inaugural mission to the new station in 1982 on board the Soyuz T-5 ferry craft. Mission planners supplied the crew with an assortment of track suit type clothes because cosmonauts and astronauts found it easier to live in work in space in clothes similar to those that they wore on Earth. The fabric of the clothes has been checked for flamablity as well as comfort.

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Sokol KV-2 (Falcon) pressure suit russian federation patch.
 

dinomartino1

Well-Known Member
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Soviet cosmonaut Anatoly Berezovoy wore this jacket as part of a shirt-sleeves flight suit during his 211 day mission to the Salyut 7 space station. Berezovoy flew to the station along with his flight engineer Valentin Lebedev as part of the inaugural mission to the new station in 1982 on board the Soyuz T-5 ferry craft. Mission planners supplied the crew with an assortment of track suit type clothes because cosmonauts and astronauts found it easier to live in work in space in clothes similar to those that they wore on Earth. The fabric of the clothes has been checked for flamablity as well as comfort.
 

dinomartino1

Well-Known Member
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NASA astronaut Norman Thagard wore this pressure suit during the launch to the space station Mir on board Soyuz TM-21 on March 14, 1995, as a member of the Mir 18 Mission (3/14/95-7/7/95). Dr. Thagard was the first American to participate in a joint Russian-American human flight mission since the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in 1975. He was also the first American to launch on board a Soyuz spacecraft.

The suit's manufacturer, Zvezda, transferred it to NASA as part of the U.S.-Russian agreement on Thagard's missio
 

dinomartino1

Well-Known Member
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Jellied Beef Tongue USSSR
Food for spaceflight must be nutritious, lightweight, and easily stored. As astronauts and cosmonauts spend increasing amounts of time in space, the food must also be appealing. This is an unflown can that contains a single portion of Jellied Beef Tongue. The meat has been prepared in a way so that a cosmonaut can open and consume it without shedding crumbs inside the space craft.

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This is a tube of Green Cabbage soup that Soviet cosmonauts could eat. The plastic-lined metal tube contains a single portion of the soup that the cosmonauts can empty into his or her mouth.
 

dinomartino1

Well-Known Member
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The first watch in history worn on a space walk was the Poljot Strela (Arrow) chronograph when Alexey Leonov stepped outside Voskhod 2 at 12:34 PM on March 18, 1965, for the first time, a human being exposed themselves directly to the hard vacuum of outer space and timing every moment of that first spacewalk, the Strela.
The Caliber 3017 Strela, standard issue for all Soviet Air Force pilots and cosmonauts from 1959 until its eventual phasing out in 1979, was a rugged, reliable piece of hardware with a densely-packed, but still attractive dial setup. A two-register chronograph It had a built-in stopwatch, a 45-minute counter, as well as a telemeter (for determining the distance to an event that can be seen and heard) and a tachymeter (for calculating speed by travel time).
Ordinary soviet citizens never got to see such a watch in stores as they where made for the airforce and were constructed to strict military specifications. The 3017 movement ceased production in the late 1970s and was replaced with the current 3133 model.

Almost immediately, the suit began malfunctioning, and while Leonov was able to attach Voskhod 2’s external camera, by the time he reached down to use his own handheld camera his suit’s joints had inflated and stiffened. His ballooning suit left him unable to bend down to reach his camera’s shutter button, and the problem continued to worsen throughout the 12 minute and 9 second EVA.
When the time came for Leonov to re-enter the capsule, the suit was so rigid he was unable to maneuver himself into position and entered the airlock sideways. Leonov was forced to manually depressurize the suit inside the airlock in order to regain movement, a move that Belyayev warned could cause a potentially fatal case of the bends, but after several minutes of struggle Leonov managed to bend well enough to return to the capsule. While much of the air inside was purged, Leonov’s suit was still reportedly filled to the knees with sweat as the astronaut had suffered an attack of heatstroke during the spacewalk. With inflated suit joints still making his movements cumbersome, he took an additional 46 seconds past schedule to return to landing position in the capsule. At the immense speeds the Voskhod 2 orbiter was traveling, this translated to an overshoot of their intended landing zone of roughly 200 miles, with the craft finally coming to rest in a heavily wooded part of the western Urals. Belyayev and Leonov equipped with a 9mm pistol inside the Voskhod 2 lander were at threat from hungry bears and wolves as well as bitter sub-freezing cold, a day later a rescue party finally arrived on skis. A rescue aircraft had herded away a wolf pack in the area.
Helicopters set out to find the stranded capsule.
The forest was impenetrablea swift rescue out of the question. Hovering above the tree line, the chopper dropped clothes and supplies into the forest. Leonov and Belyayev took the supplies that made it to the ground, and prepared for a cold night inside the capsule.
The next day a search party skied to the crash site to confirm what the helicopter had discovered the previous day, there was no way to lift the cosmonauts out of the forest. The rescuers built a log shelter and fire, and the cosmonauts spent their second night in the taiga.
The next day, Leonov and Belyayev skied several miles to a waiting helicopter, and began the long journey back to Baikonur for a debriefing.

And for all the malfunctioning equipment Alexey Leonov was forced to deal with, one of his most crucial pieces performed admirably through extreme g-forces, brutal mountain cold and the vacuum of space his personal Poljot Strela chronograph.
 
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dinomartino1

Well-Known Member
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The TP-82 (Russian: ТП-82) was a triple-barrelled Soviet pistol that was carried by cosmonauts on space missions.

It was intended as a survival aid to be used after landings and before recovery in the Siberian wilderness. The TP-82 was the result of cosmonaut Alexei Leonov's concerns after being stranded in the Siberian wilderness when his Voskhod capsule malfunctioned. He feared that the 9mm pistol that was provided in the survival kit would be ineffective against the Siberian wildlife, namely bears and wolves.

Shooting this combination pistol took more effort than most firearms. The gun had three barrels and two hammers.

The right hammer fired a 12.5 x 70-millimeter shotgun shell out of a smoothbore barrel. A vertical thumb-switch shifted the left hammer between the second smoothbore barrel and a rifle barrel underneath. This last barrel fired 5.45 x 39-millimeter rifle cartridges.
The manual action and simple mechanical selection prevented jams in the harsh conditions of the cold, damp, sub-arctic forests of the taiga.
The Granat-6 portable survival kit came with a belt, a holster for the weapon and three kinds of ammunition. The belt contained 11 rounds of SP-P 5.45 x 39 ammunition for the rifle barrel. Although the same caliber as the AK-74, SP-P rounds contained soft points.
For the shotgun barrels, the Soviet designers gave the cosmonauts 10 cartridges each of SP-D bird shot and SP-S red signal flare. This meant a crashed pilot could hunt small game and call for help.

The belt carried a 14-inch spatula-shaped machete. The knife slotted into the bottom of the gun’s pistol grip to form a makeshift butt stock. A reinforced sheath covered the blade, stopping it from slicing a chunk out of the shooter’s torso during recoil.
It was a pretty good knifetoo. Besides cutting branches for firewood or clearing a path, crashed pilots could use it to slice bricks out of impacted snow—the essential building blocks of igloos.

Even when carrying international crews, the Soyuz spacecraft continued to have a TP-82 aboard until 2007. The custom-made ammunition has long passed its shelf life, so the survival kit now includes a Russian service sidearmpresumably the high-powered MP-443 or a Makarov PM. The Russian Space Agency doesn’t discuss the TP-82 or its successor.

The TP-82 was the Swiss army knife of firearms.
 
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kirova

Active Member
nice write up Dino, are these part of your collection?

re: watch

from my many years in hanging out in watchuseek, Poljot has marketed the Yuri Gagarin watch as the "first watch in space", but little was mentioned that the Strela was the first watch to have been exposed to the vacuum of space, I guess I have learn something new today :) (and need to buy myself a Strela now, but the price for Poljot watches has skyrocketed in recent years...........)

Gagarin:


Strela:

 

dinomartino1

Well-Known Member
nice write up Dino, are these part of your collection?

re: watch

from my many years in hanging out in watchuseek, Poljot has marketed the Yuri Gagarin watch as the "first watch in space", but little was mentioned that the Strela was the first watch to have been exposed to the vacuum of space, I guess I have learn something new today :) (and need to buy myself a Strela now, but the price for Poljot watches has skyrocketed in recent years...........)

Gagarin:


Strela:

I wish
 

dinomartino1

Well-Known Member
The first watch in outer space was a Pobeda ("Victory") watch placed in the capsule of Chernushka, "Blackie" the space dog on the Korabl-Sputnik 4 mission on March 9th 1961 in order to test both life in orbit and the ejection of a human mannequin after reentry.
It was placed there by the Soviet aerospace medical researcher Dr. Abraham Genin.
 

ausreenactor

Well-Known Member
View attachment 35318
View attachment 35319
Jellied Beef Tongue USSSR
Food for spaceflight must be nutritious, lightweight, and easily stored. As astronauts and cosmonauts spend increasing amounts of time in space, the food must also be appealing. This is an unflown can that contains a single portion of Jellied Beef Tongue. The meat has been prepared in a way so that a cosmonaut can open and consume it without shedding crumbs inside the space craft.

View attachment 35320
This is a tube of Green Cabbage soup that Soviet cosmonauts could eat. The plastic-lined metal tube contains a single portion of the soup that the cosmonauts can empty into his or her mouth.

Beef tongue? No pilot would abide that!
 
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