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Bronson 37J1 - opinions wanted

Geeboo

Well-Known Member
1 pc [he gave me a few at delivery] costs about 60% of their normal order - 1000 pieces mini. Since I am responsible for all art work, he reluctantly accept my order.
 

Geeboo

Well-Known Member
The final product. The brownish color was shot under room light. The greenish color was shot with a flash which is truer to real color.

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Dr H

Well-Known Member
Looks good Geeboo, really well done.
With all of the things that you've improved though, if it were mine, I'd fix the rear of that collar height as the collar is not sitting correctly at the moment.
 

zoomer

Well-Known Member
Hopefully, Bronson will consider some larger size options in the future for all of their clothing.
There is a reason why this style of jacket has never been done in western sizing till now. I don't think it's to do with a lack of market. Asian tastemakers may consider it a smaller man's style - something that just does not look "right" on stereotyped western beef cattle.

When we talk "small man's style" or "big man's style," we're usually talking boxing. But in clothes, the difference holds. Big guys have to avoid fine detail, like mini patterns or intricate tailoring. Because they have physical presence, it makes them look fussy and too put together. If they're built sloppy (as I am ;) ) it amounts to a full on clash - everything will go out of place.

Smaller guys, tho, can show off some fineness and precision. On them, it can give presence. And here is why the 37J might be considered a small man's style - it is all precision. Details are out in the open: stitching, spacing, collars, colors. Even the fabric, finely ribbed, is as granular as a Japanese sand garden.

Despite all the weenie stitch-counting behavior about the A-2, it's a forgiving style. It's just plain enough to scale up nicely and still look elegant, and leather keeps its shape and drape. The 37J is only plain at first glance, and it's untailored fabric, so it gets more of its shape from you. It might not be so forgiving a style if scaled up, even just a size or two.

That is what I'm going to try and find out as I convert a Bedford cord jacket with stupid galoshes clasps into what I hope is a passably accurate 37J1A. If it makes me look a prat, I'll get a tanker jacket, reline it in a summer cotton, and shut my mouth.
 
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Geeboo

Well-Known Member
just to share my opinion. Art had said he wondered why it seems so easy for me to just pick out 1 label I like & I can have them made.
As said before, there is a huge amount of work involved behind the scene. - to a maniac level IMO as an amateur. I think I have almost seen All photos that can be searched on web to determine the details, the proportion for this jacket. Not to mention the drawing, the sourcing, the sourcing of tailor, the communication, the failures , etc, etc. Mine interests on this thing is far beyond hey this Real McCoy, Buzz, Goodwear... jkt looks good & buy it & put it on. I spent about 3-4 hours each day in surfing web about different aspects on clothing, reading, looking for details & add photos to my photos library, study & classify them, for at least the past 2 years. My interests on clothing started at the age of 16.
It is something like you look at TV for a performance or an athlete competition, it merely lasts for 10 sec; but they may have been practicing it for 10 years. I have stored I think over 40,000 photos on various areas regarding fashion.
We have a saying in Chinese: "1 minute on stage equals 10 years off stage". I have told people that whenever you saw someone look good in the street, there is a good chance he might have put a huge amount of effort behind. It just don't happen by chance IMO.
By no means I am saying my work is very good, you will have a better idea if you are going to custom made/ bespoke a piece of clothing or try to make a piece of clothing yourself.
P.S.
I think there are several levels of interests on clothing
1) interested, start to buy & hit the wall & learn the pros & cons of different makers & their names
2) procure to learn about the "Details" by reading books, websites, joining forums to learn
3) well-versed with the history, "details" & the makers & start building one own's collection
4) more-loaded players will try to buy limited edition or rarer originals in a vertical [all versions of the same model by year] or horizontal manner [all models of say 1 type of flight jacket]. Also, one starts to have CONTROL over one's collection - a particular theme or be very specific in the cutting or details over one's collection.
5) The ultimate evolve will either have one's own label - I can bet every retro label owner is a seasoned collector himself OR a DIYer like me
 
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zoomer

Well-Known Member
Absolutely agree! But it helps a lot if one is not 180cm, 98kg, and picky...all of which I am.

There's an American saying too: "The first 90% of a job takes 90% of the time - and the last 10% takes 90% more time."
 
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dmar836

Well-Known Member
Zoomer, great points about larger jacket sizes. Not talked about much but holds true IMO.
Geeboo, nice work and great dedication. The collar comments prove I couldn't likely make one to any reasonable standard. I guess I don't see it.
Dave
 

zoomer

Well-Known Member
The collar comments prove I couldn't likely make one to any reasonable standard. I guess I don't see it.
A knit collar needs to be:
- deep enough at the back that it will lie down and stay down, and
- not quite so deep in the front, so it doesn't look like bat wings when down and doesn't roll down the chin when up.

You don't wanna look like this guy (me in my Willis & Geiger NA-1).
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Geeboo

Well-Known Member
tks Dr, Thomas, falcon & many others here. I reckon the most rewarding thing is to receive recognition from guys of similar-mind/ similar interests.:)
dmar: The collar dimension is talking about 1-1.5cm differences. To side talk a bit, when matching or want to look cool, one has to look for some "critical" measurements. For jkts, I reckon it be sleeves length & Front length of the jacket - not chest
Also, one needs to know about the "sensitivity" of the measurements, by that I mean for different measurements, the sensitivity is different, eg: for pants, the sensitivity is about 2" - a variance of anything over 2" in thigh is likely to bring about visual differences. For collar width, it is about 0.5cm or 1/4", one can immediately spot differences in the outlook for a spread collar shirt of say 3" vs 3.25". For chest, it is also about 2". For sleeves length , it is about 1/2". For front length, it is about 1". By that one really goes into the area of bespoke IMO that normal customers should not worry about because it is the job of the tailor. However, for enthusiasts, I think there is no harm knowing that.
 
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Earloffunk

Well-Known Member
After my first very positive experience with buying my Bob Dong B-10 from China (and returning the smaller one) I decided that I needed another jacket to fill the gap between B-10 and leather for those war summer days and evenings where even leather would be too much.

So I have just pulled the trigger on two Bronson 37J1 in 40 and 42 ß hope they will get here soon. Will post pictures when they arrive.
 

dinomartino1

Well-Known Member
A question regarding the comments on the Bronson collar, does it actually sit flat or does it stick up in the air at the front because the back is too small
 

Earloffunk

Well-Known Member
Arrived today after only 4 (!) days: two jackets - one size 40 and one size 42.

What do you think? Both jackets´fit is ok but I am leaning towards the 42 as it gives a little more room and does not make me look too skinny.

First is the 40 (taken in a proper washing room environment):
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Geeboo

Well-Known Member
Me too think both sizes are ok, If 40 also offers comfort/ ease in wearing, then 40 - I mean no restriction on movements.
Sleeves IMO needs to be shortened.
Both Looks good
 
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