Amelia Earhart Flight Jacket Reproduction - The Aviatrix

Technonut2112

Well-Known Member
Looks to me that the knit cuffs on the museum jacket are folded up, probably for a neat display purpose. Look closely at the B&W pic made of it, and one can see a line where it appears to be folded-up...
 

Skyhawk

Well-Known Member
Looks to me that the knit cuffs on the museum jacket are folded up, probably for a neat display purpose. Look closely at the B&W pic made of it, and one can see a line where it appears to be folded-up...
Yeah for sure. I noticed that too. The original has long cuffs so mark that up in the original cuffs column.
However, I'm not sure that the weaving matches. It looks like the original B & W photos have a finer ribbed pattern. also I really don't see the lines on the knits from the new photos in any of the old photos.
I think the knits are different and originally were seal colored.
Aviatrix-Knits-1.jpg

avaitrix-original.jpg
avaitrix-original-Collar-3.jpg

avaitrix-original-Collar-2.jpg


I will keep on the case and update any news here...
-J
 
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Ken at Aero Leather

Well-Known Member
It's undoubtably the same model, same design, same maker, but different colour leather & Knits, that's not to suggest in any way that it didn't belong to AE just that this actual jacket can't be the one in the B/W photo.
Shame

PS I'd bet big that the knit is original to the museum jacket
 

Skyhawk

Well-Known Member
It would be interesting to find out if there is a makers label in the museum jacket.

The zipper appears to be gilt plated, perhaps to match the rest of the jacket.
That's question #1 for the museum people! I did not get an answer to my email so I will try to call today.
That Zip puller is a brass 1930's Fantail Talon. I have the right puller but in Nickel. My supplier also has brass ones so that is an easy fix.

Even if this jacket is not the same one, it is certainly made by the same maker. Probably the same size as well so a lot can be learned from this jacket.
 

Skyhawk

Well-Known Member
I just discovered a treasure chest of information online. Purdue University holds the Earhart papers.

"The George Palmer Putnam Collection of Amelia Earhart Papers (1785-1948; 16.5 Cubic ft.) documents the personal life, aviation career, and business activities of pilot Amelia Earhart. The Papers are divided into seven series:

Tons of photos, receipts, documents. Maybe a receipt for the jacket in there somewhere in the 16.5 cubic feet of materials.

There are more Hi Res photos of the jacket included! Confirmation of gusseted armpits in photo #2 Below. This feature I identified from a different photo, but this photo has a much better view of the feature.
download (10).jpg
download (24).jpg

download (22).jpg
download (26).jpg


Definitely appears that there were no lines on the knits.
 
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Technonut2112

Well-Known Member
I was just thinking (dangerous, I know) that perhaps the museum curator may elect not to be very helpful if they were knowingly passing-off a duplicate jacket of the period as the 'real-deal' for many years... Jay's painstaking research would definitely let the cat out of the bag, and force them to admit the truth. One can read how awe-inspiring seeing 'Amelia's' jacket was to the author of the posted museum article. It would ultimately result in disappointing many folks who visited over the years for sure...
 

Skyhawk

Well-Known Member
Could it be a Goldsmith? Check the pocket flaps, buttonholes suggest someone fairly new to working in leather I doubt it's a Spalding
The self coloured weave pattern lines on the knit on the Museum jacket is typical of that used on Baseball Jackets of that era. Goldsmith? Baseball?
Ha Ha wouldn't that be a riot!
Could be....hopefully we will know soon.
The buttonholes I have been thinking could have been a special request.

This jacket was made most likely in 1932. That is the earliest image I have seen. At the time, those cool A-2's just came out with those handmade button holes. It would have been an attractive feature to have on your jacket for pilots who admired those courageous combat pilots.
 

Skyhawk

Well-Known Member
I was just thinking (dangerous, I know) that perhaps the museum curator may elect not to be very helpful if they were knowingly passing-off a duplicate jacket of the period as the 'real-deal' for many years... Jay's painstaking research would definitely let the cat out of the bag, and force them to admit the truth. One can read how awe-inspiring seeing 'Amelia's' jacket was to the author of the posted museum article. It would ultimately result in disappointing many folks who visited over the years for sure...
You never know, but I sure hope that is not the case.

I have talked with the museum manager this morning. She is passing along my questions to the Archivist. She did not know too much but was very pleasant and helpful.

I should hear something back next week. Stay tuned.....
 

2BM2K

Well-Known Member
Could it be a Goldsmith? Check the pocket flaps, buttonholes suggest someone fairly new to working in leather I doubt it's a Spalding
The self coloured weave pattern lines on the knit on the Museum jacket is typical of that used on Baseball Jackets of that era. Goldsmith? Baseball?
Could be. There is a tenuous link between Amelia and the Goldsmith jacket.


pickford.jpg


She was at the same air meeting as Hap Arnold and so may have seen his Goldsmith jacket, taken a liking to it, made some enquiries and contacted Goldsmith.
 

B-Man2

Well-Known Member
Wouldn’t that be a crazy coincidence, after all the research and conversation that went into learning about a jacket that no longer exists, only to find an original Goldsmith that was once owned by Amelia Earhart, in mint condition, in a museum in Kansas.
What are the odds of that!!
 
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Skyhawk

Well-Known Member
I'm still leaning towards SAT as the maker in which case the button holes would make sense, due to the feature being on the 1932 A-2 contract. Maybe SAT did not have a button hole machine in 1932. Either way, they were well acquainted with the handmade button hole in 1932 having done 1,000's of them for the USAAC contract.
 

B-Man2

Well-Known Member
If that curator will just snap a picture of that label , and send it to you Jay, that would be outstanding !
 

Ken at Aero Leather

Well-Known Member
I'm a very quick machinist yet these (ugly) buttonholes take me between 5 and 10 minutes each as they are so fiddly and have to be very precise. I''ve been doing these this week on a sample of the Soviet "Gagarin" jacket so I'm up to date with the time taken
It takes 15 seconds to do a machine made buttonhole and the results are infinitely better
A proper Savile Row hand sewn button hole only takes about 15 minute, back in the 60's when I didn't have a leather buttonhole machine, that was what we used.
 
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Skyhawk

Well-Known Member
Cool! Can't wait for the National Geographic documentary in October, according to the article.

Seems to be a quick production time to make a Doc. They must have been working on this for a while already.
 

ausreenactor

Well-Known Member
I was just thinking (dangerous, I know) that perhaps the museum curator may elect not to be very helpful if they were knowingly passing-off a duplicate jacket of the period as the 'real-deal' for many years... Jay's painstaking research would definitely let the cat out of the bag, and force them to admit the truth. One can read how awe-inspiring seeing 'Amelia's' jacket was to the author of the posted museum article. It would ultimately result in disappointing many folks who visited over the years for sure...
I LOVE a good conspiracy!
 
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